Ambonese MalayEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Malay dia.

PronounEdit

dia

  1. he, she (3rd-person singular personal pronoun)

CatalanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan dia, from Vulgar Latin *dia, from Latin diēs, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dyḗws (heaven, sky).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dia m (plural dies)

  1. day (period of 24 hours)
    • 2011, Tobies Grimaltos Mascarós, Idees i paraules: Una filosofia de la vida quotidiana, Universitat de València →ISBN, page 41
      Avui és un dia normal. És un dia en el qual no res (m')ha passat especialment remarcable.
      Today is a normal day. It's a day in which nothing especially remarkable happened (to me).
  2. day (the part of the day between sunrise and sunset)
    • 2011, Cinto Niqui Espinosa, Fonaments i usos de tecnologia audiovisual digital, Editorial UOC →ISBN, page 362
      En ona llarga durant el dia, a Catalunya, es poden escoltar les emissores Ràdio Montecarlo (RMC), als 216 kHz o Ràdio Alger, als 252 kHz.
      In long wave during the day, in Catalonia, you can hear the broadcasters Ràdio Montecarlo (RMC) at 216 kHz or Ràdio Alger, at 252 kHz.
    Antonym: nit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Clipping of diapositief.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdi.aː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: dia
  • Rhymes: -iaː

NounEdit

dia m (plural dia's, diminutive diaatje n)

  1. (photography) slide
    Synonym: diapositief

Derived termsEdit


EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From dio +‎ -a.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdia/
  • Hyphenation: di‧a
  • Rhymes: -ia

AdjectiveEdit

dia (accusative singular dian, plural diaj, accusative plural diajn)

  1. godly, of or pertaining to God or gods, divine

FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Shortened from diapositiivi, probably after the international example.

NounEdit

dia

  1. (photography) slide

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of dia (Kotus type 9/kala, no gradation)
nominative dia diat
genitive dian diojen
partitive diaa dioja
illative diaan dioihin
singular plural
nominative dia diat
accusative nom. dia diat
gen. dian
genitive dian diojen
diainrare
partitive diaa dioja
inessive diassa dioissa
elative diasta dioista
illative diaan dioihin
adessive dialla dioilla
ablative dialta dioilta
allative dialle dioille
essive diana dioina
translative diaksi dioiksi
instructive dioin
abessive diatta dioitta
comitative dioineen
Possessive forms of dia (type kala)
possessor singular plural
1st person diani diamme
2nd person diasi dianne
3rd person diansa

SynonymsEdit

CompoundsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

dia

  1. yah!, cry to make (a) working animal(s) etc. advance or turn left

AntonymsEdit


Guinea-Bissau CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese dia. Cognate with Kabuverdianu dia.

NounEdit

dia

  1. day (period of 24 hours)
  2. day (period between sunrise and sunset)

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Shortened from diapozitív (diapositive), after the German Diapositiv.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dia (plural diák)

  1. (photography) slide, diapositive (transparent plate used with a projector for projecting images)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative dia diák
accusative diát diákat
dative diának diáknak
instrumental diával diákkal
causal-final diáért diákért
translative diává diákká
terminative diáig diákig
essive-formal diaként diákként
essive-modal
inessive diában diákban
superessive dián diákon
adessive diánál diáknál
illative diába diákba
sublative diára diákra
allative diához diákhoz
elative diából diákból
delative diáról diákról
ablative diától diáktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
diáé diáké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
diáéi diákéi
Possessive forms of dia
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. diám diáim
2nd person sing. diád diáid
3rd person sing. diája diái
1st person plural diánk diáink
2nd person plural diátok diáitok
3rd person plural diájuk diáik

IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Malay dia, cognate with ia, -nya, from Proto-Malayic *ia, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(si-)ia, from Proto-Austronesian *(si-)ia.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

dia

  1. he
    Dia sedang kelaparan.
    He is starving now.
  2. she
    Dia suka musik pop.
    She loves pop music.

SynonymsEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish día (god), from Proto-Celtic *dēwos (compare Welsh duw), from Proto-Indo-European *deywós (compare Sanskrit देव (deva), Latin deus, Old English Tīw (Germanic god of heroic glory)).

NounEdit

dia m (genitive singular , nominative plural déithe)

  1. a god
DeclensionEdit
  • Alternative vocative singular:
  • Archaic nominative plural: dée
  • Alternative genitive plural: dia
  • Alternative dative plural: déibh
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
  • Dia (God) (as a proper noun)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish día (day), from Proto-Celtic *dīyos (compare Welsh dydd), from Proto-Indo-European *dyew-.

NounEdit

dia

  1. (literary) day
Derived termsEdit
  • (on (a day of the week))
  • dialann (diary)

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
dia dhia ndia
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

AdjectiveEdit

dia f

  1. feminine singular of dio

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

dia

  1. inflection of dare:
    1. first/second/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

AnagramsEdit


KabuverdianuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese dia.

NounEdit

dia

  1. day

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dia

  1. inflection of dius:
    1. nominative/vocative feminine singular
    2. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter plural

AdjectiveEdit

diā

  1. ablative feminine singular of dius

MalagasyEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Malay liar.

AdjectiveEdit

dia

  1. wild
    Synonym: haolo

Etymology 2Edit

Possibly connected with Swahili njia.

NounEdit

dia

  1. step
  2. journey
  3. mark, track, imprint

MalayEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with ia, -nya, from Proto-Malayic *ia, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(si-)ia, from Proto-Austronesian *(si-)ia.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

dia (Jawi spelling دي‎)

  1. he, she, it

See alsoEdit


MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

dia

  1. Nonstandard spelling of diǎ.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

Univerbation of di (of/from) +‎ a (his/her/its/their)

DeterminerEdit

dia (‘his’ and ‘its’ trigger lenition, ‘her’ triggers /h/-prothesis, ‘their’ triggers eclipsis)

  1. of/from his/her/its/their
    • c. 1000, The Tale of Mac Da Thó's Pig, section 1, published in Irische Teste, vol. 1 (1880), edited by Ernst Windisch:
      Ailbe ainm in chon, ocus lan hEriu dia aurdarcus.
      Ailbe was the dog’s name, and Ireland was full of his fame.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

dia

  1. simple past and past participle of die

OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan dia.

NounEdit

dia m (plural dias)

  1. day

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Patric Guilhemjoan, Diccionari elementari occitan-francés francés-occitan (gascon), 2005, Orthez, per noste, 2005, →ISBN, page 56.

Old IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Univerbation of di (of/from) +‎ a (his/her/its/their)

DeterminerEdit

dia (‘his’ and ‘its’ trigger lenition, ‘her’ triggers /h/-prothesis, ‘their’ triggers eclipsis)

  1. of/from his/her/its/their

Etymology 2Edit

di (of/from) +‎ -a (relative pronoun)

PronounEdit

dia·

  1. of/from whom/which

ConjunctionEdit

dia

  1. (with preterite) when
    • c. 700-800, Táin Bó Cúailnge, from the Yellow Book of Lecan, published in The Táin Bó Cúailnge from the Yellow Book of Lecan, with variant readings from the Lebor na hUidre (1912, Dublin: Hodges, Figgis, and Co.), edited by John Strachan and James George O'Keeffe, TBC-I 1739
      Is and sin con·bocht fír fer fair-seom a llá sin dia lotar in cóicfer cucai-seom fón oínme .i. dá Chrúaid, dá Chalad, Derothor.
      Then the [terms for] single combat were violated against [Cú Chulainn] that day when five men came all at once [to fight against him], i.e. two Crúaids, two Calads and a Derothor.
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 58c4
      Dia luid Duaid for longais tri glenn Iosofád, da·mbidc Semei di chlochaib oc a techt.
      When David went into exile [by travelling] through the valley of Jehoshaphat, Shimei pelted [David] with stones while he was travelling.
  2. (with subjunctive, positive only) if
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 5d23
      Ní lour in bendachad dia·mmaldachae, ní lour dano in nebmaldachad mani·bendachae.
      Not enough is the blessing if you curse: not enough, also, is the non-cursing if you do not bless.
    • c. 815-840, published in "The Monastery of Tallaght", in Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy (1911-1912, Royal Irish Academy), edited and with translations by Edward J. Gwynn and Walter J. Purton, vol. 29, pp. 115–179, paragraph 26,
      Dia·cloadar som indí sin do denam dúini isind lúaon, ní fil ní de nach tairmtechd na dénat som isin domnuch.
      If those folk hear that we perform it on the [Sunday night], there is no sort of transgression they will not commit on the Sunday.
    Synonym:

Usage notesEdit

The conjunction is followed by the appropriate dependent verbal form, applying the nasal mutation to it. Unlike modern Irish, no factual-counterfactual distinction exists in the use of and dia; they are completely interchangeable.

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle Irish: dia

Etymology 3Edit

Univerbation of do (to/for) +‎ a (his/her/its/their)

DeterminerEdit

dia (‘his’ and ‘its’ trigger lenition, ‘her’ triggers /h/-prothesis, ‘their’ triggers eclipsis)

  1. to/for his/her/its/their

Etymology 4Edit

do (to/for) +‎ -a (relative pronoun)

PronounEdit

dia·

  1. to/for whom/which

Further readingEdit


Old OccitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *dia, from Latin dīēs (day).

NounEdit

dia m or f

  1. day (period of 24 hours)

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PapiamentuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese dia and Spanish día and Kabuverdianu dia.

NounEdit

dia

  1. day

PlautdietschEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dia

  1. expensive, dear

PomEdit

NounEdit

dia

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • The Linguistic Situation in the Islands of Yapen, Kurudu, Nau and Miosnum, New Guinea (1961)

PortugueseEdit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese dia (day), from Vulgar Latin *dīa, from Latin diēs (day), reformed from the accusative diem, from Proto-Italic *djēm, the accusative of *djous (day, sky), from Proto-Indo-European *dyḗws (heaven, sky).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dia m (plural dias)

  1. day
    1. period between sunrise and sunset
      • 1572, Luís Vaz de Camões, Os Lusíadas, 5th canto:
        Trazia o Sol o dia celebrado / Em que tres Reis das partes do Oriente,
        The Sun brought the celebrated day / In which three Kings from the East,
    2. period from midnight to the following midnight
    3. period of 24 hours
      • 1572, Luís Vaz de Camões, Os Lusíadas, 5th canto:
        Mas logo ao outro dia ſeus parceiros / Todos nús, & da cor da eſcura treua,
        But just the other day his partners / All naked, & coloured as the dark darkness,
    4. (astronomy) rotational period of a planet
    5. (in phrases) date celebrating a particular thing, usually an event, profession or person
    6. (in phrases) a unspecified period of time either in the past or in the future

QuotationsEdit

AntonymsEdit

  • (period of daylight): noite (night)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

AdverbEdit

dia (not comparable)

  1. occurring on the specified day of the month
    O evento ocorreu dia primeiro de fevereiro.
    The event occurred February first.

Usage notesEdit

Used the ordinal primeiro (first) for day 1 and a cardinal for 2–31

QuotationsEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish día (god), from Proto-Celtic *dēwos (compare Welsh duw), from Proto-Indo-European *deywós (compare Sanskrit देव (deva), Latin deus, Old English Tīw (Germanic god of heroic glory)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dia m (genitive singular , plural diathan)

  1. god, deity

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
dia dhia
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

  • dia” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “2 día”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

dia m (plural dias)

  1. Misspelling of día.
  2. Obsolete spelling of día

Sranan TongoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English deer.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dia

  1. deer

TolaiEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • diat (when not preceding a verb)

PronounEdit

dia

  1. they (many), them (many) (third-person plural pronoun)

DeclensionEdit



TswanaEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

go dia

  1. to delay