English

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Etymology

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1950s, from child speak.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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doo

  1. (childish) feces, particularly that of a dog.
    Synonyms: BM, doo-doo, doody, poo, poo-poo, poop

Interjection

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doo

  1. (music) Used as a scat word in singing.
    • 1995, Phil Farrand, The Nitpicker's Guide for Next Generation Trekkers: Volume 2:
      (Ever feel like you've just entered... The Twilight Zone? Doo, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo....)
    • 2006, Steve Taylor, A to X of Alternative Music, page 272:
      [] the bloke who sang about coloured girls going 'doo de doo de doo doo d'de doo de doo de doo' had once had this thing with the guy who produced the debut albums by the Stooges and Patti Smith.
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See also

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See also

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Anagrams

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Aiwoo

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Pronoun

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doo

  1. (interrogative) what
  2. (interrogative) how

References

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Galician

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Verb

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doo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of doar
  2. (reintegrationist norm) first-person singular present indicative of doer

Gooniyandi

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Noun

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doo

  1. cave

Manx

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Etymology

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From Old Irish dub, from Proto-Celtic *dubus (black), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewbʰ- (black).

Adjective

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doo

  1. black
  2. inky
    Synonym: dooagh

Derived terms

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Noun

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doo m (genitive singular doo, plural dooghyn)

  1. ink

Derived terms

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Verb

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doo

  1. to ink

Mutation

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Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
doo ghoo noo
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

See also

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Colors in Manx · daaghyn (layout · text)
     bane      lheeah      doo
             jiarg; feer-yiarg              jiarg-bwee; dhone              bwee; bane-wuigh
                          geayney, glass             
                          gorrym-ghlass, speyr-ghorrym              gorrym
             plooreenagh              jiarg gorrym              jiarg-bane
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Etymology

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(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation 1

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Particle

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doo

  1. Part of the negative correlative:
    doo ... da
    doo yáʼátʼééh dait is not good
  2. With a nominalizer, forms a negative noun phrase:
    doo yáʼátʼéehiithat which isn’t good
    doo naalnishiithe one who isn’t working
    doo bénáshniihígííthat which I don’t remember
  3. With a verb + -góó, forms a negative conditional:
    Doo naashnishgóó níká adeeshwoł.If I’m not working, I’ll help you.
Derived terms
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Pronunciation 2

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Verb

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doo

  1. Abbreviation of dooleeł (it will be).
  2. When paired with ńtʼééʼ, forms a conditional:
    Dine bizaad bóhooshʼaah doo ńtʼééʼ.I should have studied Navajo.
    Éí nizhóní doo ńtʼééʼ.That would have been nice; that could have been nice.
See also
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Norwegian Nynorsk

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Verb

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doo

  1. (obsolete) past plural of døy

Portuguese

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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doo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of doar

Rohingya

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Etymology

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Compare Assamese দা (da, a big knife)

Noun

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doo

  1. knife

Scots

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Etymology

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From Middle English douf, from Old English *dūfe (compare woman's given name Dūfe).

Akin to Old High German tūba (dove, pigeon), Icelandic dúfa (dove, pigeon), Dúfa (woman's first name)), Danish dove, pigeon, Norwegian Bokmål due (dove, pigeon), Norwegian Nynorsk due (dove, pigeon) and Swedish duva (dove, pigeon).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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doo (plural doos)

  1. dove, pigeon (bird of the dove and pigeon family: Columbidae)
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide:
      She never seemed to want for siller; the house was as bright as a new preen, the yaird better delved than the manse garden; and there was routh of fowls and doos about the small steading, forbye a wheen sheep and milk-kye in the fields.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)

Derived terms

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Solon

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Noun

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doo

  1. song

References

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  • Bayarma Khabtagaeva, Dagur Elements in Solon Evenki, 2012.

Swahili

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Etymology

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Borrowed from English dough.[1]

Noun

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doo (n class, plural doo)

  1. (Sheng) money
    Synonym: pesa

References

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  1. ^ Githiora, Chege (2002) “Sheng: Peer Language, Swahili Dialect or Emerging Creole?”, in Journal of African Cultural Studies[1], volume 15, number 2, page 179 of 159-181:doo n pesa money (<Eng. dough)

Teposcolula Mixtec

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Etymology

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From Proto-Mixtec *ⁿdòòʔ.

Noun

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doo

  1. cane

Derived terms

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References

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  • Alvarado, Francisco de (1593) Vocabulario en lengua misteca (in Spanish), Mexico: En casa de Pedro Balli, page 43v:caña de comer. doo.