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See also: Dara, dåra, dará, darà, dāra, dāra, and dārā

Contents

Crimean TatarEdit

NounEdit

dara

  1. tare

DeclensionEdit


DharugEdit

NounEdit

dara

  1. tooth

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from a Turkic language. Compare Turkish darı.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈdɒrɒ]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: da‧ra

NounEdit

dara (plural darák)

  1. grits (hulled and coarsely ground grain)
  2. (weather) sleet, ice pellets

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative dara darák
accusative darát darákat
dative darának daráknak
instrumental darával darákkal
causal-final daráért darákért
translative darává darákká
terminative daráig darákig
essive-formal daraként darákként
essive-modal
inessive darában darákban
superessive darán darákon
adessive daránál daráknál
illative darába darákba
sublative darára darákra
allative darához darákhoz
elative darából darákból
delative daráról darákról
ablative darától daráktól
Possessive forms of dara
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. darám daráim
2nd person sing. darád daráid
3rd person sing. darája darái
1st person plural daránk daráink
2nd person plural darátok daráitok
3rd person plural darájuk daráik

Derived termsEdit

(Compound words):

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Zaicz, Gábor. Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN

IlocanoEdit

IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Sanskrit दार (dāra, wife).

NounEdit

dara (plural dara-dara, first-person possessive daraku, second-person possessive daramu, third-person possessive daranya)

  1. maiden
  2. virgin

InterlinguaEdit

VerbEdit

dara

  1. future of dar

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish indala, from ind (the) + aile (second, other), from Proto-Celtic *alyos (compare Welsh ail), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂élyos (compare Latin alius, Gothic 𐌰𐌻𐌾𐌹𐍃 (aljis)).

AdjectiveEdit

dara (triggers h-prothesis)

  1. second
    an dara haoisthe second century

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected forms.

NounEdit

dara

  1. genitive singular of dair (oak)

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
dara dhara ndara
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

JavaneseEdit

Other scripts
Carakan ꦢꦫ
Roman dara

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Javanese dara (dove, pigeon)

NounEdit

dara (krama-ngoko dara)

  1. pigeon
  2. dove

Etymology 2Edit

From Sanskrit दार (dāra, wife)

NounEdit

dara (krama-ngoko dara)

  1. virgin

KapampanganEdit

NounEdit

dara

  1. aunt

LatvianEdit

VerbEdit

dara

  1. 3rd person singular present indicative form of darīt
  2. 3rd person plural present indicative form of darīt
  3. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of darīt
  4. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of darīt

MalteseEdit

VerbEdit

dara (imperfect jidra)

  1. to get used to

ConjugationEdit


Old JavaneseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

dara

  1. dove
  2. pigeon

ReferencesEdit

  • "dara" in P.J. Zoetmulder with the collaboration of S.O. Robson, Old Javanese-English Dictionary. 's-Gravenhage: M. Nijhoff, 1982.

Scottish GaelicEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NumeralEdit

dara

  1. second

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


SheltaEdit

EtymologyEdit

Reversed and modified from the Irish arán.

NounEdit

dara

  1. bread

ReferencesEdit

  • Language in Danger Andrew Dalby, 2003

TagalogEdit

NounEdit

dará

  1. angry shout (usually accompanied with the stamping of feet)

TurkishEdit

NounEdit

dara (definite accusative darayı, plural daralar)

  1. tare

WanyiEdit

NounEdit

dara

  1. dog
    daramukunuthere are many dogs around

ReferencesEdit

  • Mary Laughren, Rob Pensalfini, Tom Mylne, Accounting for verb-initial order in an Australian language, in Verb First: On the syntax of verb-initial languages (2005)