See also: Whit

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English wiȝt, wight, from Old English wiht (wight, person, creature, being, whit, thing, something, anything), from Proto-Germanic *wihtą (thing, creature) or *wihtiz (essence, object), from Proto-Indo-European *wekti- (cause, sake, thing), from *wekʷ- (to say, tell). Cognate with Old High German wiht (creature, thing), Dutch wicht, German Wicht. Doublet of wight.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

whit (plural whits)

  1. The smallest part or particle imaginable; an iota.
    He worked tirelessly to collect and wind a ball of string eight feet around, and it matters not one whit.
    • 1602: William Shakespeare, Hamlet, act V scene 2
      Not a whit.
    • 1917, Incident by Countee Cullen
      Now I was eight and very small, \ And he was no whit bigger \ And so I smiled, but he poked out \ His tongue, and called me, 'Nigger.'
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

PrepositionEdit

whit

  1. Eye dialect spelling of with.

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old English hwīt, from Proto-Germanic *hwītaz.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

whit (plural and weak singular white, comparative whitter, superlative whittest)

  1. white, pale, light (in color)
    • c. 1395, John Wycliffe, John Purvey [et al.], transl., Bible (Wycliffite Bible (later version), MS Lich 10.)‎[1], published c. 1410, Apocalips 1:14, page 117v; republished as Wycliffe's translation of the New Testament, Lichfield: Bill Endres, 2010:
      ⁊ þe heed of him ⁊ his heeris weren whiyt as whiyt wolle .· ⁊ as ſnow / ⁊ þe iȝen of him as flawme of fier .·
      And his head and his hairs were white, like white wool or snow, and his eyes were like fire's flame.
  2. (referring to people) wearing white clothes
  3. (referring to people) having white skin
  4. attractive, fair, beautiful
  5. bright, shining, brilliant
  6. (referring to plants) having white flowers
  7. (heraldry) silver, argent (tincture)
  8. (alchemy) Inducing the transmutation of a substance into silver
  9. (medicine) Unusually light; bearing the pallor of death

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: white
  • Scots: quhite, fyte, fite, whyte, white
  • Yola: whit

ReferencesEdit

NounEdit

whit

  1. white (colour)
  2. white pigment
  3. The white of an egg
  4. The white of an eye
  5. white fabric
  6. white wine
  7. dairy products
  8. Other objects notable for being white

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

See alsoEdit

Colors in Middle English · coloures, hewes (layout · text)
     whit      grey, hor      blak
             red; cremesyn, gernet              citrine, aumbre; broun, tawne              yelow, dorry; canevas
             grasgrene              grene             
             plunket; ewage              asure, livid              blewe, blo, pers
             violet; inde              rose, murrey; purpel, purpur              claret

ScotsEdit

PronounEdit

whit

  1. what