See also: Hoch

CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From derivatives of holý, e.g. holobrádek, holeček, holec, holomúdec, +‎ -ch.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ɦox]
  • (file)

NounEdit

hoch m anim (feminine holka)

  1. boy
    Synonyms: kluk, chlapec

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • hoch in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • hoch in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German hōch, from Old High German hōh, from Proto-West Germanic *hauh, from Proto-Germanic *hauhaz, from Proto-Indo-European *kewk-, a suffixed form of *kew-. Compare Dutch hoog, English high, Swedish hög.

The irregular declension from the stem hoh- is due to the development of Old High German -h-, which in Middle High German became /x/ in coda position, but /h/ elsewhere (which latter was then gradually lost, starting from the north). Stem alternations of this kind were usually levelled in modern German, as for example in nah, Schuh (Middle High German nāch, schuoch). Most dialects have also levelled hoch, but the standard language has preserved the alternation in this isolated case.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

hoch (strong nominative masculine singular hoher, comparative höher, superlative am höchsten)

  1. high, tall
  2. high, great, immense
  3. grand, important

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

AdverbEdit

hoch (comparative höher, superlative am höchsten)

  1. up, upwards
  2. (colloquial, figuratively) northwards
    Wir fahren hoch an die Küste.
    We'll drive up to the coast.
  3. (mathematics) to the power of
    fünf hoch vier
    five to the power of four, (5⁴)

Further readingEdit

  • hoch” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • hoch” in Uni Leipzig: Wortschatz-Lexikon