See also: chèz

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French chez.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

chez

  1. At the home of
    • 2008 February 28, Lisa Forest, “Mind the gap: Empty house, empty nest, empty fridge”, in The Telegraph[1]:
      Even if I say so myself, Christmas chez the Forests is quite a heart-warming affair. For Ben, growing up, it was pure magic - a log fire in the grate, ...

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French chiese, chese, from Latin casae, dative of casa(house). Doublet of case.

PrepositionEdit

chez

  1. to the house of
    Je rentre chez moi — “I'm going home”
  2. at the house of
    chez moi — “at my house”
    chez lui — “at his house”
    chez Françoise — “at Françoise’s house”
    chez M. Dupont — “at Mr. Dupont’s house”
    chez les Durant — “at the Durants’, or, in the Durant family” (see: in, which follows)
  3. at the office or place of business of
    chez le dentiste — “at the dentist”
    chez l'avocat — “at the lawyer's office”
    chez le boucher — “at the butcher's shop”
  4. among (a group of things or people of the same type)
    Cette maladie se voit souvent chez les chiens. — “This illness is often seen in dogs.”
    Chez les Anglais, ... — “In England, ...” or “By english people, ...”

Derived termsEdit

External linksEdit