See also: Inna, inną, -inna, and inná

EnglishEdit

ContractionEdit

inna

  1. (colloquial) In the.
    • 1991, The Beat
      In state-of-the-art dance hall, the bass booms like electrified tympani, the snare gets busy inna quasimilitary techno stylee []

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

inna

  1. Romanization of 𐌹𐌽𐌽𐌰

HausaEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Kanuri yìnná (aunt).

NounEdit

innà f (possessed form innàr̃)

  1. mother
  2. maternal aunt
  3. A polite term of address for any older woman.
  4. (Hausa animistic religion) royal priestess
  5. polio

ReferencesEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

iszik +‎ -na

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ ˈinːɒ]
  • Hyphenation: in‧na

VerbEdit

inna

  1. third-person singular conditional present indefinite of iszik

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse inna.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

inna (weak verb, third-person singular past indicative innti, supine innt)

  1. (transitive, with accusative) to do, to accomplish
  2. (transitive, with accusative) to tell

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit


Old IrishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

Alternative formsEdit

ArticleEdit

inna

  1. genitive singular feminine of in (triggers /h/-prothesis before a vowel)
    • c. 875, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 21c3
      In tan téte a laithe di chiunn cosnaib gnimaib ⁊ cosnaib imnedaib gniter and, do·tét iarum imthánud aidche tara hæsi, co ndermanammar-ni inna imned sin i mbiam isind laithiu tri chumsanad inna aidche dod·iarmorat.
      When the day passes away with the deeds and the troubles that are done therein, then comes the alternation of night after it that we may forget those troubles in which we are in the day through the repose of the night that follows it.
  2. nominative plural feminine/neuter of in (triggers /h/-prothesis before a vowel)
    • c. 875, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 27b15
      Inna ancride inna fochaide do·bertar forsin n-aís noib, ad·cobrat-sidi cumscugud fercæ Dǽ do thabairt díglae tara n-ési.
      The cruelties of the afflictions that are wrought on the saints desire the stirring of the anger of God to inflict vengeance on their behalf.
  3. accusative plural of all genders of in (triggers /h/-prothesis before a vowel)
    • c. 875, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 21c3
      In tan téte a laithe di chiunn cosnaib gnimaib ⁊ cosnaib imnedaib gniter and, do·tét iarum imthánud aidche tara hæsi, co ndermanammar-ni inna imned sin i mbiam isind laithiu tri chumsanad inna aidche dod·iarmorat.
      When the day passes away with the deeds and the troubles that are done therein, then comes the alternation of night after it that we may forget those troubles in which we are in the day through the repose of the night that follows it.
  4. genitive plural of all genders of in (triggers eclipsis)
    • c. 875, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 27b15
      Inna ancride inna fochaide do·bertar forsin n-aís noib, ad·cobrat-sidi cumscugud fercæ Dǽ do thabairt díglae tara n-ési.
      The cruelties of the afflictions that are wrought on the saints desire the stirring of the anger of God to inflict vengeance on their behalf.

Etymology 2Edit

Univerbation of i (in) +‎ a (his/her/its/their)

DeterminerEdit

inna (‘his’/‘its’ triggers lenition, ‘her’ triggers /h/-prothesis, ‘their’ triggers eclipsis)

  1. in his/her/its/their
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 11a4
      Rethit huili, et is oínḟer gaibes búaid diib inna chomalnad.
      All run, and it is one man of them who gets victory for completing it (lit. in its completion).
    • c. 875, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 42a4
      Ní·guid dígail du thabairt foraib, acht corru·anat inna arrad.
      He prays not that punishment should be inflicted on them, but that they may remain in his company.

Old NorseEdit

VerbEdit

inna

  1. to accomplish

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • inna in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *in.

AdverbEdit

inna

  1. inside
  2. indoors

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

inna

  1. feminine nominative/vocative singular of inny