See also: Jade, jáde, jäde, jadę, јаде, and яде

EnglishEdit

 
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A jadeite ball

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /d͡ʒeɪd/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪd

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from French le jade, rebracketing of earlier l'ejade (jade), from Spanish piedra de ijada (flank stone), via Vulgar Latin *iliata from Latin ilia (flank) (jade was thought to cure pains in the side.).[1]

NounEdit

jade (usually uncountable, plural jades)

  1. A semiprecious stone, either nephrite or jadeite, generally green or white in color, often used for carving figurines.
    • 2012 March 1, Lee A. Groat, “Gemstones”, in American Scientist[1], volume 100, number 2, page 128:
      Although there are dozens of different types of gems, among the best known and most important are diamond, ruby and sapphire, emerald and other gem forms of the mineral beryl, chrysoberyl, tanzanite, tsavorite, topaz and jade.
    Synonyms: jadestone, jade stone, yu
  2. A bright shade of slightly bluish or greyish green, typical of polished jade stones.
    jade:  
    Synonym: jade green
  3. A succulent plant, Crassula ovata.
    Synonyms: jade plant, lucky plant, money plant, money tree
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit
  • Appendix:Colors
  • AdjectiveEdit

    jade (not comparable)

    1. Of a grayish shade of green, typical of jade stones.

    Etymology 2Edit

    From Middle English [Term?], either a variant of yaud[2] or merely influenced by it. Yaud derives from Old Norse jalda (mare), from a Uralic language, such as Moksha эльде (elʹde) or Erzya эльде (elʹde).[3][4] See yaud for more.

    NounEdit

    jade (plural jades)

    1. A horse too old to be put to work.
      • 1760, Laurence Sterne, The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, London: R. & J. Dodsley, Volume I, Chapter 10, p. 36,[2]
        Let that be as it may, as my purpose is to do exact justice to every creature brought upon the stage of this dramatic work,—I could not stifle this distinction in favour of Don Quixote’s horse;—in all other points the parson’s horse, I say, was just such another,—for he was as lean, and as lank, and as sorry a jade, as HUMILITY herself could have bestrided.
      • 1817, Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey, Chapter 11,[3]
        My horse would have trotted to Clifton within the hour, if left to himself, and I have almost broke my arm with pulling him in to that cursed broken-winded jade’s pace.
      Synonyms: nag, yaud
    2. (especially derogatory) A bad-tempered or disreputable woman.
      • c. 1598, William Shakespeare, Much Ado about Nothing, Act I, Scene 1,[4]
        You always end with a jade’s trick: I know you of old.
      • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, Dublin: John Smith, Volume I, Book I, Chapter 4, p. 14,[5]
        However, what she withheld from the Infant, she bestowed with the utmost Profuseness on the poor unknown Mother, whom she called an impudent Slut, a wanton Hussy, an audacious Harlot, a wicked Jade, a vile Strumpet, with every other Appellation with which the Tongue of Virtue never fails to lash those who bring a Disgrace on the Sex.
      • 1847, Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights, chapter III:
        ‘You shall pay me for the plague of having you eternally in my sight—do you hear, damnable jade?’
      • 1848, William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair, Chapter 9:
        Sir Pitt Crawley was a philosopher with a taste for what is called low life. His first marriage with the daughter of the noble Binkie had been made under the auspices of his parents; and as he often told Lady Crawley in her lifetime she was such a confounded quarrelsome high-bred jade that when she died he was hanged if he would ever take another of her sort ...
    SynonymsEdit
    TranslationsEdit

    VerbEdit

    jade (third-person singular simple present jades, present participle jading, simple past and past participle jaded)

    1. To tire, weary or fatigue
    2. (obsolete) To treat like a jade; to spurn.
    3. (obsolete) To make ridiculous and contemptible.
    SynonymsEdit
    Derived termsEdit
    TranslationsEdit

    ReferencesEdit

    1. ^ jade” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.
    2. ^ Eric Partridge, Origins: A Short Etymological Dictionary of Modern English →ISBN, 2006)
    3. ^ Per Thorson, Anglo-Norse studies: an inquiry into the Scandinavian elements in the modern English dialects, volume 1 (1936), page 52: "Yad sb. Sc Nhb Lakel Yks Lan, also in forms yaad, yaud, yawd, yoad, yod(e).... [jad, o] 'a work-horse, a mare' etc. ON jalda 'made', Sw. dial. jäldä, from Finnish elde (FT p. 319, Torp p. 156 fol.). Eng. jade is not related."
    4. ^ Saga Book of the Viking Society for Northern Research, page 18: "There is thus no etymological connection between ME. jāde MnE. jade and ME. jald MnE. dial. yaud etc. But the two words have influenced each other mutually, both formally and semantically."

    DanishEdit

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    jade c (singular definite jaden, uncountable)

    1. (mineralogy) jade

    FinnishEdit

     
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    PronunciationEdit

    • IPA(key): /ˈjɑde/, [ˈjɑde̞]
    • Rhymes: -ɑde
    • Syllabification: ja‧de

    NounEdit

    jade

    1. (mineralogy) jade

    DeclensionEdit

    Inflection of jade (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
    nominative jade jadet
    genitive jaden jadejen
    partitive jadea jadeja
    illative jadeen jadeihin
    singular plural
    nominative jade jadet
    accusative nom. jade jadet
    gen. jaden
    genitive jaden jadejen
    jadeinrare
    partitive jadea jadeja
    inessive jadessa jadeissa
    elative jadesta jadeista
    illative jadeen jadeihin
    adessive jadella jadeilla
    ablative jadelta jadeilta
    allative jadelle jadeille
    essive jadena jadeina
    translative jadeksi jadeiksi
    instructive jadein
    abessive jadetta jadeitta
    comitative jadeineen
    Possessive forms of jade (type nalle)
    possessor singular plural
    1st person jadeni jademme
    2nd person jadesi jadenne
    3rd person jadensa

    FrenchEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    Rebracketed from earlier l'ejade (jade), from Spanish piedra de ijada (flank stone), via Vulgar Latin *iliata from Latin ilia (flank) (jade was thought to cure pains in the side).

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    jade m (plural jades)

    1. jade

    Further readingEdit

    AnagramsEdit


    PortugueseEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From French le jade, rebracketing of earlier l'ejade (jade), from Spanish piedra de ijada (flank stone), via Vulgar Latin *iliata from Latin ilia (flank) (jade was thought to cure pains in the side).

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    jade m (plural jades)

    1. jade (gem)

    Serbo-CroatianEdit

    NounEdit

    jade (Cyrillic spelling јаде)

    1. vocative singular of jad

    SpanishEdit

     
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    EtymologyEdit

    From French le jade, rebracketing of earlier l'ejade (jade), from Spanish piedra de ijada (flank stone), via Vulgar Latin *iliata from Latin ilia (flank) (jade was thought to cure pains in the side).

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    jade m (plural jades)

    1. (mineralogy) jade

    Derived termsEdit

    AnagramsEdit