See also: näg and nǡǵ

English

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Etymology 1

edit

From Middle English nagg, nage, nagge (horse, small riding horse, pony), cognate with Dutch negge, neg (horse), German Nickel (small horse). Perhaps related to English neigh.

Noun

edit

nag (plural nags)

  1. A small horse; a pony.
  2. An old, useless horse.
    Synonyms: (Northern England, Scotland, dialectal, archaic) aver, dobbin, hack, jade, plug
    • 2011, James Ellroy, Clandestine, →ISBN, page 245:
      We used to lure the nags into the back of our truck with oats and sugar, then we'd drive back to town to this warehouse and inject the nags with small quantities of morphine I'd stolen.
  3. (obsolete, derogatory) A paramour.
Coordinate terms
edit
  • (old useless horse): bum (racing)
Derived terms
edit
Translations
edit

Etymology 2

edit

Probably from a North Germanic source; compare Swedish nagga (to gnaw, grumble), Danish nage, Icelandic nagga (to complain).

Verb

edit

nag (third-person singular simple present nags, present participle nagging, simple past and past participle nagged)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To repeatedly remind or complain to (someone) in an annoying way, often about insignificant or unnecessary matters.
    • 2006, Jerry Day, How to Raise Kids You Want to Keep, →ISBN:
      The room is never cleaned, so her mother nags and nags until she explodes with frustration and threatens to sell her to the lowest bidder.
    Anyone would think that I nagged at you, Amanda! (From Amanda! by Robin Klein)
  2. To bother with persistent thoughts or memories.
    • 2010, John David Wells, Diamonds of Affection and Other Stories, →ISBN, page 100:
      I guess it happens all the time in crime stories where the detective suddenly remembers a bit of conversation that nags him in some way, then for some inexplicable reason, it's just right there in front of you, like a sign pointing 'here!
    • 2010, John Goldingay, Key Questions about Christian Faith: Old Testament Answers, →ISBN:
      Sometimes I write because there is a question that nags at me, sometimes because there is a question that nags at other people.
    • 2013, Ra Page, L.E. Yates, Ann Winter, Parenthesis: A New Generation in Short Fiction:
      You are sleeping on your side in the bed in your flat, heavily embroiled in a dream which sucks and nags at you and makes no sense; an old primary school teacher is there and a cat you have to take to a supermarket; you are in a canoe.
    The notion that he forgot something nagged him the rest of the day.
  3. To bother or disturb persistently in any way.
    • 1999, Tim Parks, Adultery and Other Diversions, →ISBN:
      But at night, around the uncertain edge of dreams, and when the wind nags, there are few whom an odd sound will not thrill
    • 2013, Tina Egnoski, Perishables, →ISBN:
      When a breeze comes up and nags the surface, it sparkles like a gemstone.
    • 2014, James Lane Allen, The Last Christmas Tree: An Idyl of Immortality, →ISBN, page 8:
      We are well accustomed as we look out upon Nature at close range to see great creatures harrassed[sic] by little creatures. The lot of each big one seems to be in the keeping of some little one, which never quits it, nags it, stings it, wears it out, drives it desperate, makes life somewhat a burden to it and death somewhat a relief.
    a nagging pain in his left knee
    a nagging north wind
Synonyms
edit
  • (continually remind or complain): ride
  • (bother with thoughts or memories): haunt
  • (persistently bother or annoy): worry
Derived terms
edit
edit
Translations
edit

Noun

edit

nag (plural nags)

  1. Someone or something that nags.
    • 2011, M.C. Beaton -, Death of a Nag, →ISBN:
      'That fellow is a nag.' 'Aye, the worst kind,' agreed Hamish, and then smiled, and at that smile, Miss Gunnery thawed even more.
    • 2014, Louise Hathaway, Nags, Sluts, and A Deep-Breasted Soulmate from the Shining City, →ISBN:
      When we see Wolfe struggling with many depictions of woman characters throughout the novel (the earlier ones being nags and white trash), we greatly admire the development of this living tribute to Aline Bernstein, a woman whom he ends up despising in his later life.
    • 2015 -, Dwight McNeill, Using Person-Centered Health Analytics to Live Longer, →ISBN:
      But, pchA has to produce more than awareness, always-on alerts/nags, or edu-tainment.
  2. A repeated complaint or reminder.
    • 2011, Mike Bryant, Peter Mabbutt, Hypnotherapy For Dummies, →ISBN:
      And finally the biggest thank you of all to my partner Steven Winston for your love, enthusiasm, encouragement, support, humour, nags, and glasses of wine.
    • 2015, Steve Brookstein, Getting Over the X, →ISBN, page 58:
      I turned it on Eileen and threw in a couple of my normal nags about her driving.
    • 2016, Suzie Hayman, John Coleman, Parents and Digital Technology: How to Raise the Connected Generation, →ISBN:
      A girl who expects her mother to nag her about her untidy bedroom will hear that message, even though the mother may want to talk about something quite different, so a loving invitiation to go shopping that started "When you've finished in your bedroom this morning. . ." might result in the child screaming, storming out and slamming the door because she expected this to be a nag about the state of the room and didn't let you finish with “ . . . shall we go to the shopping centre?”.
  3. A persistent, bothersome thought or worry.
    • 1938, Norman Lindsay, Age of Consent, 1st Australian edition, Sydney, N.S.W.: Ure Smith, published 1962, →OCLC, page 152:
      All that while there was a little nag going on at the back of his mind, which he strove to disregard. But it insisted on attention, and to get rid of it he put down his palette abruptly and got out his mustard-tin cash-box and counted his money.
    • 2009, James Swift, How I Survived Three Years at a Two-Year Community College, →ISBN:
      During my lengthy aerobic strolls (which more or less served as a tool of meditation), that thought about “college” became a persistent nag.
    • 2014, Graham Allcott, How to be a Productivity Ninja, →ISBN:
      There are two ways to get rid of our nags. We can either use Ninja decision-making to turn them quickly into actions, stored in our second brain to be revisited when we have some time. Or we can simply just capture and collect the nag, knowing that our systems will ensure we return to it later.
    • 2016, Sarah Lowndes, The DIY Movement in Art, Music and Publishing, →ISBN:
      That feeling turned into a very persistent nag.
Synonyms
edit
Derived terms
edit
Translations
edit

Etymology 3

edit

Noun

edit

nag

  1. Misspelling of knack.

References

edit

See also

edit

Anagrams

edit

Afrikaans

edit

Etymology

edit

From Dutch nacht (night), from Middle Dutch nacht, from Old Dutch naht, from Proto-Germanic *nahts, from Proto-Indo-European *nókʷts.

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

nag (plural nagte)

  1. The period between sunset and sunrise, when the sky is dark; night.
  2. (countable) darkness.

Colán

edit

Noun

edit

nag

  1. moon

Danish

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

nag n (singular definite naget, not used in plural form)

  1. grudge

Derived terms

edit

Verb

edit

nag

  1. imperative of nage

Gaikundi

edit

Noun

edit

nag

  1. sago

Further reading

edit

German

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Verb

edit

nag

  1. singular imperative of nagen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of nagen

Serbo-Croatian

edit

Etymology

edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *nagъ, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *nōˀgás, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *nogʷós (naked).

Pronunciation

edit

Adjective

edit

nȃg (Cyrillic spelling на̑г, definite nȃgī)

  1. naked
    Synonyms: gȏl,

Declension

edit

Derived terms

edit

Slovene

edit

Etymology

edit

From Proto-Slavic *nagъ, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *nogʷós (naked).

Pronunciation

edit

Adjective

edit

nȃg (not comparable)

  1. naked

Inflection

edit
 
The diacritics used in this section of the entry are non-tonal. If you are a native tonal speaker, please help by adding the tonal marks.
Hard
masculine feminine neuter
nom. sing. nág nága nágo
singular
masculine feminine neuter
nominative nág ind
nági def
nága nágo
genitive nágega náge nágega
dative nágemu nági nágemu
accusative nominativeinan or
genitive
anim
nágo nágo
locative nágem nági nágem
instrumental nágim nágo nágim
dual
masculine feminine neuter
nominative nága nági nági
genitive nágih nágih nágih
dative nágima nágima nágima
accusative nága nági nági
locative nágih nágih nágih
instrumental nágima nágima nágima
plural
masculine feminine neuter
nominative nági náge nága
genitive nágih nágih nágih
dative nágim nágim nágim
accusative náge náge nága
locative nágih nágih nágih
instrumental nágimi nágimi nágimi

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Synonyms

edit

Derived terms

edit

Further reading

edit
  • nag”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Welsh

edit

Etymology

edit

From Proto-Celtic *nekʷe, a combination of Proto-Indo-European *ne (negative particle) and *-kʷe (and); compare Latin neque.

Pronunciation

edit

Particle

edit

nag

  1. not (in answers and tag questions)

Usage notes

edit

Used before a vowel, but not when that vowel has resulted from the soft mutation of g. Thus na + gallan becomes na allan, not *nag allan.

Alternative forms

edit
  • na (used before a consonant)

White Hmong

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Etymology 1

edit

From Proto-Hmong *m-noŋᶜ (rain); likely related to Proto-Mien *mbluŋᶜ (id) and Proto-Mon-Khmer *pliɲ ~ *[p]liiɲ ~ *[p]liəɲ (sky), whence Khmer ភ្លៀង (phliəng, id).[1]

Noun

edit

nag (classifier: kob (for showers), phau (for a period of rain))

  1. rain
Derived terms
edit

Etymology 2

edit
This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.
Particularly: “Considered native Hmongic by Ratliff, though no reconstructed proto-form is given.[2] Perhaps a semantic extension of Etymology 1 - that is, with the arrival of rain signifying a different day from the current day? Or perhaps even a fossilization of an older meaning of "sky, day" (compare the Proto-Mon-Khmer term mentioned in Etymology 1)?”

Noun

edit

nag

  1. used to denote days different from today:
    1. short for nag hmo (yesterday)
    2. used in nag kis (the day after tomorrow)

References

edit
  • Heimbach, Ernest E. (1979) White Hmong — English Dictionary[1], SEAP Publications, →ISBN, page 135.
  1. ^ Ratliff, Martha (2010) Hmong-Mien language history (Studies in Language Change; 8), Camberra, Australia: Pacific Linguistics, →ISBN, pages 48-9; 277.
  2. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20101031002604/http://wold.livingsources.org/vocabulary/25

Wolof

edit

Etymology

edit

Cognate with Fula nagge.

Noun

edit

nag (definite form nag wi)

  1. cow, cattle

Zhuang

edit

Etymology

edit

From Proto-Tai *naːkᴰ (otter). Cognate with Thai นาก (nâak), Lao ນາກ (nāk), Tai Dam ꪙꪱꪀ, Tày nạc, Ahom 𑜃𑜀𑜫 (nak).

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

nag (Sawndip forms 𤜽 or or 𭸐 or 𭸢 or , 1957–1982 spelling nag)

  1. otter
    Synonym: duznag