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DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch liggen, from Old Dutch liggen, from Proto-Germanic *ligjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *legʰ-.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɪɣə(n)/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪɣən

VerbEdit

liggen

  1. (intransitive) to lie; to be lying down
  2. (intransitive, often of place names) to be, to be placed or located
    Er ligt een hoop rommel op zolder.
    There is a lot of rubbish in the attic.
    Kun je me zeggen waar Geldrop ligt?
    Could you tell me where Geldrop is (located)?
  3. (auxiliary, with te) Forms a continuous aspect. Although it carries an implication of lying, this is vague and is not emphasized.
    Je biefstuk ligt daar koud te worden.
    Your steak is (lying) there getting cold.

InflectionEdit

Inflection of liggen (strong class 5)
infinitive liggen
past singular lag
past participle gelegen
infinitive liggen
gerund liggen n
present tense past tense
1st person singular lig lag
2nd person sing. (jij) ligt lag
2nd person sing. (u) ligt lag
2nd person sing. (gij) ligt laagt
3rd person singular ligt lag
plural liggen lagen
subjunctive sing.1 ligge lage
subjunctive plur.1 liggen lagen
imperative sing. lig
imperative plur.1 ligt
participles liggend gelegen
1) Archaic.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


Dutch Low SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Saxon liggian, from Proto-Germanic *ligjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *legʰ-. Compare Dutch liggen, German liegen, West Frisian lizze, English lie, Danish ligge.

VerbEdit

liggen (past singular lag, past participle elaegen, auxiliary verb waen or hebben)

  1. (intransitive) to lie; to be lying down
  2. (intransitive, often of place names) to be, to be placed or located
    Daor ligt mien hoes an de waterkaante.
    There is my house by the coast.
    Kön i'j mi'j wiezen waor Bersenbrügge ligt?
    Could you tell me where Bersenbrücke is (located)?
  3. (intransitive, with te and another verb) Used as an alternative to waen + an 't to form a continuous aspect.
    Jan veel in t water. No ligt ziene klere te dreugen op t grösveld.
    Jan fell in the water. Now his clothes are lying on the lawn to dry.

German Low GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Saxon liggian, from Proto-Germanic *ligjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *legʰ-. Compare Dutch liggen, German liegen, West Frisian lizze, English lie, Danish ligge.

VerbEdit

liggen (past singular leeg, past participle legen, auxiliary verb hebben)

  1. (intransitive) to lie; to be lying down
  2. (intransitive, often of place names) to be, to be placed or located
    Dor liggt mien Huus an't Waterkant.
    There is my house by the coast.
    Köönt ji mi wiesen wor Bersenbrügge liggt?
    Could you tell me where Bersenbrücke is (located)?
  3. (intransitive, with te and another verb) Used as an alternative to wesen + an't to form a continuous aspect.
    Dien Eten liggt dor kold to warren.
    Your food is (lying) there getting cold.

Usage notesEdit

  • The grammar given is for a Northern Low Saxon dialect that merges all close-mid and mid-open vowels and elides syllable-final schwa. As such it is lacking distinctions that are grammatical in other dialects.

ConjugationEdit


Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch liggen, from Proto-Germanic *ligjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *legʰ-.

VerbEdit

liggen

  1. to lie, be lying horizontal
  2. to lie, to have been placed
  3. to be located, to be present
  4. to live (in a place)

InflectionEdit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • licghen (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • liggen”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Old DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *ligjaną.

VerbEdit

liggen

  1. to lie
  2. to be located

InflectionEdit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • liggen”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012