See also: Iris, IRIs, íris, Íris, and iris-

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English [Term?], from Latin īris, from Ancient Greek ἶρις (îris, rainbow), from Proto-Indo-European *wey-ro- (a twist, thread, cord, wire), from *weh₁y- (to turn, twist, weave, plait). Cognate to English wire.

This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.
Particularly: “Online Etymology Dictionary: The eye region was so called (early 15c. in English) for being the part that gives color to the eye; the Greek word was used of any brightly colored circle, "as that round the eyes of a peacock's tail" [Liddell & Scott]”

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: ī'rĭs, IPA(key): /ˈaɪ.ɹɪs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪɹɪs

NounEdit

 
A plant of the genus Iris.
 
Illustration showing parts of the human eye, including the iris.

iris (plural irises or iris or irides) (See Usage notes)

  1. (botany) A plant of the genus Iris, common in the northern hemisphere, and generally having attractive blooms (See   Iris (plant) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia ).
    • 1907 August, Robert W[illiam] Chambers, “Afterglow”, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326, page 168:
      Breezes blowing from beds of iris quickened her breath with their perfume; she saw the tufted lilacs sway in the wind, and the streamers of mauve-tinted wistaria swinging, all a-glisten with golden bees; she saw a crimson cardinal winging through the foliage, and amorous tanagers flashing like scarlet flames athwart the pines.
  2. (anatomy) The contractile membrane perforated by the pupil, which adjusts to control the amount of light reaching the retina, and which forms the colored portion of the eye (See   Iris (anatomy) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia ).
  3. (photography, cinematography) A diaphragm used to regulate the size of a hole, especially as a way of controlling the amount of light reaching a lens.
  4. (poetic) A rainbow, or other colourful refraction of light.
  5. (electronics) A constricted opening in the path inside a waveguide, used to form a resonator.
  6. (zoology) The inner circle of an oscillated color spot.

Usage notesEdit

  • For the part of the eye, the most common plural is irises, though irides is usual in medical contexts.
  • For the flower both iris and irises are in common use.

QuotationsEdit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:iris.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

VerbEdit

iris (third-person singular simple present irises, present participle irising, simple past and past participle irised)

  1. (of an aperture, lens, or door) To open or close in the manner of an iris.
  2. (literary) To cause (something) to shine with the colours of the rainbow; to make iridescent.
    Synonym: iridize
    • 1834, Jacob Abbott, The Corner-Stone, Boston: William Peirce, Chapter 1, p. 31,[1]
      Pure, transparent, glistening in the sun, and irised by a thousand hues, which float and wave and spread in graceful and ceaseless motion on its surface!
    • 1987, Charles Tomlinson, “Winter Journey” in The Return, Oxford University Press, p. 35,[2]
      The sun as it comes indoors out of space
      Has left a rainbow irising each glass—
      A refraction, caught then multiplied
      From the crystal tied within our window,

AnagramsEdit


Bikol CentralEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: i‧ris
  • IPA(key): /ʔiˈɾis/

NounEdit

irís

  1. (anatomy) side of the body
    Synonyms: tagiliran, hirog

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin iris, from Ancient Greek ἶρις (îris).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

iris m (plural iris)

  1. iris (part of the eye)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin īris or Middle French iris (itself from Latin), from Ancient Greek ἶρις (îris).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

iris f (plural irissen, diminutive irisje n)

  1. (anatomy) iris (coloured part of the eye)
    Synonym: regenboogvlies
  2. (botany) iris, plant of the genus Iris

EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

iris

  1. past of iri

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin iris, Ancient Greek ἶρις (îris).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

iris m (plural iris)

  1. iris

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


IdoEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

iris

  1. past of irar

IndonesianEdit

NounEdit

iris (first-person possessive irisku, second-person possessive irismu, third-person possessive irisnya)

  1. slice

VerbEdit

mengiris

  1. to slice

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish iris f (a thong or strap (from which a shield, bag, etc. is suspended)).

NounEdit

iris f (genitive singular irise, nominative plural irisí or irseacha or irste)

  1. strap, sling (for carrying)
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish iress (religion, creed, the (true) faith).

NounEdit

iris f (genitive singular irise)

  1. (literary) belief, faith, religion
DeclensionEdit
Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

iris f (genitive singular irise, nominative plural irisí)

  1. Alternative form of oireas
  2. magazine, journal
    Synonym: irisleabhar
  3. gazette
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

iris m

  1. inflection of ireas (iris):
    1. genitive/vocative singular
    2. nominative/dative plural

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
iris n-iris hiris not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin iris, Ancient Greek ἶρις (îris).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈi.ris/
  • Rhymes: -iris
  • Hyphenation: ì‧ris

NounEdit

iris m or f (invariable)

  1. iris (flower)
    Synonyms: giaggiolo, iride

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek ἶρις (îris).

NounEdit

īris f (genitive iridis); third declension

  1. rainbow
    • 405, Jerome and others, Vulgate, Revelation 10:1
      et vidi alium angelum fortem descendentem de caelo amictum nube et iris in capite eius et facies eius erat ut sol et pedes eius tamquam columna ignis

Third-declension noun (i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative īris īrēs
Genitive īris īrium
Dative īrī īribus
Accusative īrem īrēs
īrīs
Ablative īre īribus
Vocative īris īrēs

īrīs

  1. dative/ablative plural of īra

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no
 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek ἶρις (îris, rainbow).

NounEdit

iris m (definite singular irisen, indefinite plural iriser, definite plural irisene)

  1. (botany) an iris (flower)
  2. (anatomy) an iris (part of the eye)
    Synonym: regnbuehinne

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek ἶρις (îris, rainbow).

NounEdit

iris m (definite singular irisen, indefinite plural irisar, definite plural irisane)

  1. (botany) an iris (flower)
  2. (anatomy) an iris (part of the eye)
    Synonym: regnbogehinne

ReferencesEdit


Old IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

iris

  1. Alternative spelling of iriss: accusative/dative singular of ires

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
iris unchanged n-iris
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

iris f (invariable)

  1. Obsolete spelling of íris

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French iris, Latin iris, from Ancient Greek ἶρις (îris).

NounEdit

iris n (plural irisuri)

  1. (anatomy) iris (of the eye)

DeclensionEdit

NounEdit

iris n (plural iriși)

  1. (botany) iris (flower)
    Synonyms: stânjenel, stânjen

DeclensionEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.) Compare Irish iris.

NounEdit

iris f (genitive singular irise, plural irisean)

  1. magazine, periodical
    Synonym: ràitheachan

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
iris n-iris h-iris t-iris
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin iris, Ancient Greek ἶρις (îris).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈiɾis/, [ˈi.ɾis]

NounEdit

iris m (plural iris or írises)

  1. (anatomy) iris

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit