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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French réservoir (collection place) (fig.), réservoir (storehouse) (lit.). in turn from French réserver (to reserve, keep).[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɹɛz.ə.vwɑː(ɹ)/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɹɛz.ə(ɹ).vwɑɹ/, /ˈɹɛz.ə(ɹ).vwɔɹ/, /ˈɹɛz.ə(ɹ).vɔɹ/
  • (file)

NounEdit

reservoir (plural reservoirs)

  1. A place where anything is kept in store
  2. A large natural or artificial lake used as a source of water supply.
  3. A small intercellular space, often containing resin, essential oil, or some other secreted matter.
  4. A supply or source of something.
    • 2013 May-June, Katie L. Burke, “In the News”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 193:
      Bats host many high-profile viruses that can infect humans, including severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola. A recent study explored the ecological variables that may contribute to bats’ propensity to harbor such zoonotic diseases by comparing them with another order of common reservoir hosts: rodents.
  5. A species that acts as host to a zoonosis when it is not causing acute illness in other susceptible species.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French réservoir.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /reː.zərˈvʋaːr/, /reː.zɛrˈvʋaːr/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: re‧ser‧voir

NounEdit

reservoir n (plural reservoirs, diminutive reservoirtje n)

  1. reservoir

Derived termsEdit