English

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Etymology

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From Middle English martir, from Old English martyr, itself a borrowing from Ecclesiastical Latin martyr, from Ancient Greek μάρτυρ (mártur), later form of μάρτυς (mártus, witness).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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martyr (plural martyrs)

  1. One who willingly accepts being put to death for adhering openly to one's religious beliefs; notably, saints canonized after martyrdom.
    Saint Stephen was the first Christian martyr.
  2. (by extension) One who sacrifices their life, station, or something of great personal value, for the sake of principle or to sustain a cause.
  3. (with a prepositional phrase of cause) One who suffers greatly and/or constantly, even involuntarily.
    Stan is a martyr to arthritis, Chris a martyr to Stan's endless moaning about it.
    • 1937, AJ Cronin, The Citadel:
      He'd been a martyr to asthma all his life.
    • 1982, J. G. Thirlwell (lyrics and music), “J.Q. Murder”, in Ache, performed by You've Got Foetus on Your Breath:
      J.Q. Murder wears sandpaper suits
      Broken glass in pocket, barbed wire boots
      Not because he's mean, but because he's a martyr
      He makes Jackie Collins look like Jean-Paul Sartre

Antonyms

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Hyponyms

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Derived terms

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Translations

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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb

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martyr (third-person singular simple present martyrs, present participle martyring, simple past and past participle martyred)

  1. (transitive) To make someone into a martyr by putting them to death for adhering to, or acting in accordance with, some belief, especially religious; to sacrifice on account of faith or profession.
  2. (transitive) To persecute.
    Some religious and other minorities were martyred until extinction.
  3. (transitive) To torment; to torture.

Synonyms

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Derived terms

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Translations

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References

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  1. 1.0 1.1 martyr”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, launched 2000.

Danish

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Etymology

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From Old Danish martir. Borrowed via Ecclesiastical Latin martyr from Ancient Greek μάρτυς (mártus, witness).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [ˈmɑːˌtˢyɐ̯ˀ]

Noun

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martyr c (singular definite martyren, plural indefinite martyrer)

  1. martyr

Declension

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References

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French

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Etymology

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Inherited from Old French martire, borrowed from Ecclesiastical Latin martyr, from Ancient Greek μάρτυρ (mártur), later form of μάρτυς (mártus, witness).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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martyr m (plural martyrs, feminine martyre)

  1. martyr
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Further reading

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Latin

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Etymology

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From Ancient Greek μάρτυρ (mártur), later form of μάρτυς (mártus, witness).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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martyr m or f (genitive martyris); third declension

  1. (Ecclesiastical Latin) martyr, especially a Christian martyr

Declension

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Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative martyr martyrēs
Genitive martyris martyrum
Dative martyrī martyribus
Accusative martyrem martyrēs
Ablative martyre martyribus
Vocative martyr martyrēs
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Descendants

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References

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Norman

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Etymology

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From Ecclesiastical Latin martyr, from Ancient Greek μάρτυρ (mártur), later form of μάρτυς (mártus, witness).

Noun

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martyr m (plural martyrs)

  1. (religion) martyr

Norwegian Bokmål

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Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology

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Borrowed from Ecclesiastical Latin martyr, from Ancient Greek μάρτυρ (mártur), later form of μάρτυς (mártus, witness).

Noun

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martyr m (definite singular martyren, indefinite plural martyrer, definite plural martyrene)

  1. martyr
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References

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Norwegian Nynorsk

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Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology

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Borrowed from Ecclesiastical Latin martyr, from Ancient Greek μάρτυρ (mártur), later form of μάρτυς (mártus, witness).

Noun

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martyr m (definite singular martyren, indefinite plural martyrar, definite plural martyrane)

  1. martyr
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References

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Old English

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Ecclesiastical Latin martyr, from Ancient Greek μάρτυρ (mártur), later form of μάρτυς (mártus, witness).

Noun

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martyr m

  1. martyr

Declension

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Derived terms

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References

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Swedish

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Ecclesiastical Latin martyr, from Ancient Greek μάρτυρ (mártur), later form of μάρτυς (mártus, witness).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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martyr c

  1. martyr

Declension

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Declension of martyr 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative martyr martyren martyrer martyrerna
Genitive martyrs martyrens martyrers martyrernas
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Further reading

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