See also: ORC

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French orque, Italian orca, and their source, Latin orca (type of whale).

NounEdit

orc (plural orcs)

  1. (archaic) Any of several large, ferocious sea creatures, now especially the killer whale. [from 16th c.]
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

 
Savage orc

Probably from Italian orco (man-eating giant); later revived by J. R. R. Tolkien, partly after Old English orc (demon); both from Latin Orcus (the underworld; the god Pluto). Doublet of ogre.

NounEdit

orc (plural orcs)

  1. (fantasy, mythology) A mythical evil monstrous humanoid creature, occasionally porcine, usually quite aggressive and often green. [from 17th c.]
    • 1656, Samuel Holland, Don Zara del Fogo, I.1:
      Who at one stroke didst pare away three heads from off the shoulders of an Orke, begotten by an Incubus.
    • 1834, "The National Fairy Mythology of England" in Fraser's Magazine for Town and Country, Vol. 10, p. 53:
      The chief exploit of the hero, Beowulf the Great, is the destruction of the two monsters Grendel and his mother; both like most of the evil beings in the old times, dwellers in the fens and the waters; and both, moreover, as some Christian bard has taken care to inform us, of "Cain's kin," as were also the eotens, and the elves, and the orcs (eótenas, and ylfe, and orcneas).
    • 1954, JRR Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring:
      There was a flash like flame and the helm burst asunder. The orc fell with cloven head.
HypernymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

All are borrowed. Some listed may be semantic loans.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

NounEdit

orc m (plural orcs)

  1. An orc.

Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Compare Old Saxon ork.

NounEdit

orc m (nominative plural orcas)

  1. cup, tankard
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin Orcus (the underworld; the god Pluto).

NounEdit

orc m

  1. a demon
  2. hell
DeclensionEdit

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *ɸorkos, from Proto-Indo-European *pórḱos. Cognate with Latin porcus and English farrow.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

orc m

  1. piglet
    Synonym: banb

DeclensionEdit

Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative orc orcL oircL
Vocative oirc orcL orcuH
Accusative orcN orcL orcuH
Genitive oircL orc orcN
Dative orcL orcaib orcaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
orc unchanged n-orc
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English orc.

NounEdit

orc m (plural orcs)

  1. (fantasy) orc (evil, monstrous humanoid creature)