See also: Orca and orça

English

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Orca

Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin orca (tun, cask; whale), see there for more. Although the origin is obscure, the sometimes-cited association with orcus (underworld) is folk-etymology. Doublet of orc.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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orca (plural orcas or orca)

  1. A sea mammal (Orcinus orca) related to dolphins and porpoises, commonly called the killer whale.
    Synonyms: grampus, killer whale, blackfish
    • 1876, Alexander Schultz, “Account of the Fisheries and Seal-Hunting in the White Sea, the Arctic Ocean, and the Caspian Sea”, in United States Commission of Fish and Fisheries. Part III. Report of the Commissioner for 1873-4 and 1874-5., Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, page 55:
      In the summer, when the weather is calm and beautiful, large flocks of orcæ can be seen approaching the shallow places near the shore, or between the numerous islands of the White Sea. Several fishermen associate for hunting orcæ, each one furnishing a boat, and a large seine made of cords of the thickness of a finger, the meshes being 10½ inches square.

Derived terms

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Translations

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See also

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Anagrams

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Catalan

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin orca.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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orca f (plural orques)

  1. orca

Further reading

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Galician

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Etymology

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From Latin orca.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈɔɾka/ [ˈɔɾ.kɐ]
  • Rhymes: -ɔɾka
  • Hyphenation: or‧ca

Noun

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orca f (plural orcas)

  1. orca, killer whale
    Synonym: candorca

Further reading

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Hungarian

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Etymology

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A compound of orr (nose) +‎ száj (mouth)orrszáj, transformed to orca over the centuries.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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orca (plural orcák)

  1. (archaic) cheek
    Holonym: (face) arc
    • 1844, Sándor Petőfi, translated by John Ridland, János vitéz[1], chapter 4, stanza 5, lines 1-2:
      „Hej, Iluskám! hogyne volnék én halovány, / Mikor szép orcádat utószor látom tán…”
      “Oh, Nelly love! How could I help but look white, / When your lovely face soon will be torn from my sight…”
    • 1872, Mór Jókai, Az arany ember[2] (Timar’s Two Worlds),[3] part 1, chapter 2, translated by Mrs. Hegan Kennard:
      A kormányos ölnyi termetű kemény férfi volt, erősen rezes arcszínnel, a két orcáján a pirosság vékony hajszálerek szövevényében fejezte ki magát, miktől a szeme fehére is recés volt.
      The steersman is a six-foot weather-beaten sailor with a very red face, whose color on both cheeks comes from a network of veins with which the white of the eye is also transfused.

Declension

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Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative orca orcák
accusative orcát orcákat
dative orcának orcáknak
instrumental orcával orcákkal
causal-final orcáért orcákért
translative orcává orcákká
terminative orcáig orcákig
essive-formal orcaként orcákként
essive-modal
inessive orcában orcákban
superessive orcán orcákon
adessive orcánál orcáknál
illative orcába orcákba
sublative orcára orcákra
allative orcához orcákhoz
elative orcából orcákból
delative orcáról orcákról
ablative orcától orcáktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
orcáé orcáké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
orcáéi orcákéi
Possessive forms of orca
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. orcám orcáim
2nd person sing. orcád orcáid
3rd person sing. orcája orcái
1st person plural orcánk orcáink
2nd person plural orcátok orcáitok
3rd person plural orcájuk orcáik

Derived terms

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Compound words

Further reading

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  • orca in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Irish

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Etymology

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From Old Irish orca.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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orca f (genitive singular orcan, nominative plural oircne)

  1. (literary) calf (of leg)
    Synonyms: colpa, pluc

Declension

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Mutation

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Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
orca n-orca horca not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading

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Italian

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Etymology 1

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From Latin orca.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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orca f (plural orche)

  1. killer whale; orca
    Synonym: balena assassina
    • 1516, Ludovico Ariosto, “Canto decimo [Canto 10]”, in Orlando Furioso [Raging Roland]‎[4], Venice: Gabriel Giolito, published 1551, page 41:
      Vi fu legata pur quella mattina,
      Dove venia per trangughiarla viva
      Quel smisurato Mostro Orca marina,
      che di abhorrevole esca si nutriva
      That morning, she was tied up there, where that enormous monster, marine orca, feeding on horrible bait, was coming to swallow her alive
    • 1619, Michelangelo Buonarroti the Younger, La fiera[5], published 1726, page 198:
      Per quelle cave algose,
      Preda d’orche voraci, e d’onde avare
      Through those caves filled with seaweeds, prey to voracious orcas, and ungenerous waves

Etymology 2

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Borrowed from Dutch hulk.

Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈor.ka/
  • Rhymes: -orka
  • Hyphenation: ór‧ca

Noun

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orca f (plural orche)

  1. (nautical, historical) hulk (large ship used for transportation)

Further reading

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  • orca1 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana
  • orca2 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Anagrams

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Latin

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Etymology

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Either borrowed from Ancient Greek ὕρχη (húrkhē, earthen fish-salting vessel), or else both borrowed separately from a substrate Mediterranean language. The sense of whale is likely influenced by ὄρυξ (órux, pickaxe; oryx; narwhal).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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orca f (genitive orcae); first declension

  1. orc, orca (kind of whale)
  2. butt, tun (large-bellied vessel)

Declension

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First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative orca orcae
Genitive orcae orcārum
Dative orcae orcīs
Accusative orcam orcās
Ablative orcā orcīs
Vocative orca orcae

Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • Proto-West Germanic: *ork (see there for further descendants)
  • Spanish: orca
  • Portuguese: orca
  • Italian: orca
  • Galician: orca
  • French: orque
    • English: orc
  • Catalan: orca
  • Romanian: orca
  • English: orca
  • Dutch: orka
  • German: Orca
  • Serbo-Croatian:
  • Polish: orka

References

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  • orca”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • orca”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • orca in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • orca in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • orca”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898), Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • orca”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890), A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Portuguese

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Pronunciation

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  • Hyphenation: or‧ca

Noun

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orca f (plural orcas)

  1. orca
    Synonym: baleia-assassina

Spanish

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Etymology

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From Latin orca.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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orca f (plural orcas, masculine orco, masculine plural orcos)

  1. orca, killer whale
    Synonym: ballena asesina

Further reading

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Anagrams

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