See also: Pell, Pëll, pell', and pełł

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pɛl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛl

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin pellis (animal skin, pelt), from Proto-Indo-European *pel-ni-. Distantly related to fell and film.

NounEdit

pell (plural pells)

  1. A fur or hide.
  2. A lined cloak or its lining.
  3. A roll of parchment; a record kept on parchment.
    • 1835, Frederick Devon (editor and translator), Issue Roll of Thomas de Brantingham, Bishop of Exeter, Lord High Treasurer of England, Containing Payments Made out of His Majesty′s Revenue in the 44th Year of King Edward III.: A.D. 1370, page xi,
      The clerk of the pell (whose office is in the Lord Treasurer′s gift) keepeth the Pells in parchment, called Pelles Receptæ, wherein every teller′s bill, with his name on it, is to be entred; and under every such bill when it is entred, recordatur to be written in open court, for a controlment to charge the teller with so much money as in the said bill is set downe.
      He also anciently kept another pell, called Pellis Exitus, wherein every dayes issuing of any the moneys paid into the receipt, was to be entered, and by whom and by what warrant, privy seale, or bill, it was paid.
  4. (Sussex) A body of water somewhere between a pond and a lake in size.
  5. An upright post, often padded and covered in hide, used to practice strikes with bladed weapons such as swords or glaives.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

VerbEdit

pell (third-person singular simple present pells, present participle pelling, simple past and past participle pelled)

  1. To pelt; to knock about.

BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Welsh pell (far).

AdverbEdit

pell

  1. far

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan, from Latin pellis, pellem, from Proto-Indo-European *pel- (to cover, wrap; skin, hide; cloth).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pell f (plural pells)

  1. (anatomy) skin
  2. pelt

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

pell

  1. singular imperative of pellen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of pellen

WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kʷel-.[1]

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

pell (feminine singular pell, plural pell, equative pelled, comparative pellach, superlative pellaf)

  1. far, distant

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
pell bell mhell phell
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Morris Jones, John (1913) A Welsh Grammar, Historical and Comparative, Oxford: Clarendon Press, § 89 i