See also: RAID and ráid

English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Scots raid, from Northern Middle English rade, from Old English rād (a riding, an expedition on horseback, road), whence also the inherited English road (way, street). The earlier senses of “a riding, expedition, raid” fell into disuse in Early Modern English, but were revived in the northern form raid by Walter Scott in the early 19th century. The use for a swift police operation appears in the later 19th century and may perhaps have been influenced by French razzia (similar in both original meaning and sound).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɹeɪd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪd

Noun edit

raid (plural raids)

  1. (military) A quick hostile or predatory incursion or invasion in a battle.
    • 1805, Sir Walter Scott, The Lay of the Last Minstrel, page 109:
      Marauding chief! his sole delight / The moonlight raid, the morning fight.
    • 1872, Herbert Spencer, The Principles of Biology, volume 1, page 315:
      There are permanent conquests, temporary occupation, and occasional raids.
  2. An attack or invasion for the purpose of making arrests, seizing property, or plundering.
    a police raid of a narcotics factory
    a raid of contractors on the public treasury
    • 2004 April 15, “Morning swoop in hunt for Jodi's killer”, in The Scotsman[1]:
      For Lothian and Borders Police, the early-morning raid had come at the end one of biggest investigations carried out by the force, which had originally presented a dossier of evidence on the murder of Jodi Jones to the Edinburgh procurator-fiscal, William Gallagher, on 25 November last year.
  3. (sports) An attacking movement.
    • 2011 October 20, Jamie Lillywhite, “Tottenham 1 - 0 Rubin Kazan”, in BBC Sport[2]:
      The athletic Walker, one of Tottenham's more effective attacking elements with his raids from right-back, made a timely intervention after Rose had been dispossessed and even Aaron Lennon was needed to provide an interception in the danger zone to foil another attempt by the Russians.
  4. (Internet) An activity initiated at or towards the end of a live broadcast by the broadcaster that sends its viewers to a different broadcast, primarily intended to boost the viewership of the receiving broadcaster. This is frequently accompanied by a message in the form of a hashtag that is posted in the broadcast's chat by the viewers.
    • 2017 November 3, Ethan Gach, “What Twitch's New Raiding System Means For Streamers”, in Kotaku[3], archived from the original on November 9, 2017:
      Now that Twitch is making raids an official part of the platform, however, some streamers think the new feature will make it easier to participate in the positive aspects of raiding.
    • 2017 October 20, Sarah Perez, “Twitch unveils a suite of new tools to help creators grow their channels and make money”, in TechCrunch[4], archived from the original on November 4, 2017:
      Now streamers can use a new feature that lets their viewers join a raid then drive traffic to another streamer with just a click.
  5. (online gaming) A large group in a massively multiplayer online game, consisting of multiple parties who team up to defeat a powerful enemy.

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

Verb edit

raid (third-person singular simple present raids, present participle raiding, simple past and past participle raided)

  1. (transitive) To engage in a raid against.
    The police raided the gambling den.
    The soldiers raided the village and burned it down.
    A group of mobsters raided an art museum and stole a bunch of paintings.
  2. (transitive) To lure from another; to entice away from.
  3. (transitive) To indulge oneself by taking from.
    I raided the fridge for snacks.

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Spanish: raid
  • French: raid
  • Italian: raid
  • Polish: rajd
  • Romanian: raid
  • Swedish: räd

Translations edit

Anagrams edit

Basque edit

Etymology edit

From Spanish raid, from English raid.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /rai̯d/, [rai̯ð̞]

Noun edit

raid inan

  1. (military) raid
    Synonym: razzia
  2. long-distance race, rally

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • raid”, in Euskaltzaindiaren Hiztegia [Dictionary of the Basque Academy], Euskaltzaindia

French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English raid, from Scots raid. Doublet of rade from Middle English.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

raid m (plural raids)

  1. (military) raid

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Italian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English raid, from Scots raid. Doublet of rade from Middle English.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

raid m (invariable)

  1. raid, incursion
  2. long-distance race or rally

References edit

  1. ^ raid in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Anagrams edit

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French raid, from English raid, from Scots raid.

Noun edit

raid n (plural raiduri)

  1. raid

Declension edit

Scots edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English rade, northern variant of rode, from Old English rād.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

raid (plural raids)

  1. raid

Descendants edit

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English raid, from Scots raid. Doublet of rade from Middle English.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈraid/ [ˈrai̯ð̞]
  • Rhymes: -aid
  • Syllabification: raid

Noun edit

raid m (plural raides)

  1. raid (military)
  2. attempt
  3. long-distance race

Further reading edit

Veps edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Finnic *raita, borrowed from Proto-Germanic *spraiþō.

Noun edit

raid

  1. willow

Inflection edit

Inflection of raid (inflection type 5/sana)
nominative sing. raid
genitive sing. raidan
partitive sing. raidad
partitive plur. raidoid
singular plural
nominative raid raidad
accusative raidan raidad
genitive raidan raidoiden
partitive raidad raidoid
essive-instructive raidan raidoin
translative raidaks raidoikš
inessive raidas raidoiš
elative raidaspäi raidoišpäi
illative raidaha raidoihe
adessive raidal raidoil
ablative raidalpäi raidoilpäi
allative raidale raidoile
abessive raidata raidoita
comitative raidanke raidoidenke
prolative raidadme raidoidme
approximative I raidanno raidoidenno
approximative II raidannoks raidoidennoks
egressive raidannopäi raidoidennopäi
terminative I raidahasai raidoihesai
terminative II raidalesai raidoilesai
terminative III raidassai
additive I raidahapäi raidoihepäi
additive II raidalepäi raidoilepäi