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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

VerbEdit

rode

  1. simple past tense of ride

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

rode (plural rodes)

  1. (nautical) The line from a vessel to its anchor.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See road.

NounEdit

rode (plural rodes)

  1. (obsolete) A raid; an incursion.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Edmund Spenser to this entry?)
  2. (obsolete) A roadstead.

AnagramsEdit


Alemannic GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

rode (third-person singular simple present rodt, past participle grodt, auxiliary haa)

  1. (transitive, reflexive) to move, stir
    • 1908, Meinrad Lienert, ’s Heiwili, I.5:
      Äs stoht im Stubli, rod't si nüd.

ReferencesEdit

  • “rode” in Abegg, Emil, (1911) Die Mundart von Urseren (Beiträge zur Schweizerdeutschen Grammatik. IV.) [The Dialect of Urseren], Frauenfeld, Switzerland: Huber & co., page 35.

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rode

  1. vocative singular of rod

DanishEdit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /roːdə/, [ˈʁoːðə]

NounEdit

rode c (singular definite roden, plural indefinite roder)

  1. (military) file
  2. tax collector's district

DeclensionEdit

VerbEdit

rode (imperative rod, infinitive at rode, present tense roder, past tense rodede, perfect tense har rodet)

  1. to mess up (make a physical mess of)
  2. to rummage, to root

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rode

  1. Inflected form of rood

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

GalicianEdit

GermanEdit

VerbEdit

rode

  1. First-person singular present of roden.
  2. First-person singular subjunctive I of roden.
  3. Third-person singular subjunctive I of roden.
  4. Imperative singular of roden.

AnagramsEdit


HunsrikEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

rode

  1. to guess

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

LatinEdit

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English rōd, from Proto-Germanic *rōdō.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rode (plural rodes or roden)

  1. A cross or gibbet.
  2. The cross of Christ.
  3. The cross as an emblem of Christianity, such as:
    1. As an emblem representing torment, suffering, or tribulation
    2. A crucifix
  4. A rod, pole, or bar
  5. A quarter of an acre; a rood
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English rād, from Proto-Germanic *raidō.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rode (plural rodes or roden)

  1. ride, journey, voyage
  2. harbour, roadstead
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old English rudu.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈrud(ə)/, /ˈroːd(ə)/

NounEdit

rode (plural rodes or roden)

  1. ruddiness, redness
  2. face, appearance, visage
  3. Pot marigold, calendula (Calendula officinalis)
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 4Edit

From Old English ġerād, rād.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rode (plural rodes)

  1. (rare) reckoning, judgement, account
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 5Edit

From Old English *rodd.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rode (plural roddes)

  1. Alternative form of rodde (rod)

Pennsylvania GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare German raten, Dutch raden, English read.

VerbEdit

rode

  1. to advise, to counsel
  2. to guess

PlautdietschEdit

VerbEdit

rode

  1. to guess
  2. to advise, to suggest

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

rode

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of rodar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of rodar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of rodar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of rodar

Serbo-CroatianEdit

VerbEdit

rode (Cyrillic spelling роде)

  1. third-person plural present of roditi

VenetianEdit

NounEdit

rode

  1. plural of roda