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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Sanskrit राग (rāga, dye, colour).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

raga (plural ragas)

  1. (music) Any of various melodic forms used in Indian classical music, or a piece of music composed in such a form.
    • 1924, EM Forster, A Passage to India, Penguin 2005, p. 72:
      ‘The song is composed in a raga appropriate to the present hour, which is the evening.’
  2. Passion, love, lust.
    • 2009, Jennifer Schwamm Willis, The Joy of Yoga, →ISBN:
      The conditions of asmita, raga, dvesha, and abhinivesha have a physical basis: they function to inhibit the normal pulsatory rhythms of the physical body.
    • 2009, Swami Ambikananda Saraswati, Healing Yoga, →ISBN, page 18:
      We get tired of the slipping and sliding between raga and dvesha and we seek something more permanent - so instead of looking outward we begin to look inward. This is Yoga - the heart of Yoga.
    • 2010, Chogyam Trungpa, The Collected Works of Chogyam Trungpa, →ISBN:
      In order to increase security, desire (raga, trishna, lobha) appears in all its forms, and one accumulates more and more of that which establishes one's position in samsara.
    • 2012, Swami Rama, Sadhana: The Path to Enlightenment, →ISBN, page 80:
      Raga and dvesha, attachment and hatred, are two sides of the same coin.

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


BalineseEdit

RomanizationEdit

raga

  1. Romanization of ᬭᬕ
  2. Romanization of ᬭᬵᬕ

IndonesianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

raga (plural raga-raga, first-person possessive ragaku, second-person possessive ragamu, third-person possessive raganya)

  1. basket
  2. ball (for sports)

Etymology 2Edit

From Pali राग (attachment, lust), from Sanskrit राग (rāga, passion, desire).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ra.ɡa/
  • Hyphenation: ra‧ga

NounEdit

raga

  1. body

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Dayak.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ra.ɡa/
  • Hyphenation: ra‧ga

NounEdit

raga

  1. slice

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit


IrishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

raga m (genitive singular raga, nominative plural ragaí)

  1. worthless person or thing
  2. worthlessness, dissipation
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From English, from Sanskrit.

NounEdit

raga m (genitive singular raga, nominative plural ragaí)

  1. (music) raga

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • "raga" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “raga” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Clipping of ragazzi (guys).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

raga m pl (plural only)

  1. (slang, colloquial) A form of address for a group of persons of either gender; guys.
    Ehi raga, andiamo in spiaggia oggi?Hey guys, wanna go to the beach today?

LatvianEdit

NounEdit

raga m

  1. genitive singular form of rags

Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /râɡa/
  • Hyphenation: ra‧ga

NounEdit

rȁga f (Cyrillic spelling ра̏га)

  1. old horse, nag

DeclensionEdit


Southern NdebeleEdit

VerbEdit

-raga?

  1. to drive (cattle)

InflectionEdit

This entry needs an inflection-table template.


SwahiliEdit

 
raga

NounEdit

raga (n class, plural raga)

  1. rugby (a sport where players can hold or kick an ovoid ball)

WestrobothnianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Scanian rawa, Danish rave. Compare Old Norse ráfa (waver, go with staggering gait,) English rove.

VerbEdit

raga

  1. To stagger.

SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

raga m

  1. A tall and narrow tree sapling.
  2. A sloping dried-up tree.