See also: Shear

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sheren, scheren, from Old English sċieran, from Proto-West Germanic *skeran, from Proto-Germanic *skeraną, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ker- (to cut).

Cognate with West Frisian skeare, Low German scheren, Dutch scheren, German scheren, Danish skære, Norwegian Bokmål skjære, Norwegian Nynorsk skjera, Swedish skära, Serbo-Croatian škare ("scissors"); and (from Indo-European) with Ancient Greek κείρω (keírō, I cut off), Latin caro (flesh), Albanian shqerr (to tear, cut), harr (to cut, to mow), Lithuanian skìrti (separate), Welsh ysgar (separate). See also sharp.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

shear (third-person singular simple present shears, present participle shearing, simple past sheared or shore, past participle shorn or sheared)

  1. To cut, originally with a sword or other bladed weapon, now usually with shears, or as if using shears.
  2. To remove the fleece from a sheep etc by clipping.
  3. (physics) To deform because of forces pushing in opposite directions.
  4. (mathematics) To transform by displacing every point in a direction parallel to some given line by a distance proportional to the point’s distance from the line.
  5. (mining, intransitive) To make a vertical cut in the coal.
  6. (Scotland) To reap, as grain.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Jamieson to this entry?)
  7. (figurative) To deprive of property; to fleece.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

shear (countable and uncountable, plural shears)

  1. A cutting tool similar to scissors, but often larger.
    Synonym: shears
  2. The act of shearing, or something removed by shearing.
    • 1837, William Youatt, Sheep: Their Breeds, Management, and Diseases
      After the second shearing, he is a two-shear ram; [] at the expiration of another year, he is a three-shear ram; the name always taking its date from the time of shearing.
  3. (physics) Forces that push in opposite directions.
  4. (mathematics) A transformation that displaces every point in a direction parallel to some given line by a distance proportional to the point’s distance from the line.
  5. (geology) The response of a rock to deformation usually by compressive stress, resulting in particular textures.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

shear

  1. Misspelling of sheer.

AnagramsEdit