Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Back-formation from trepant.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

trepar (first-person singular present trepo, first-person singular preterite trepí, past participle trepat); root stress: (Central, Valencian, Balearic) /e/

  1. (transitive) to drill, bore

Conjugation edit

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Further reading edit

Galician edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Attested since 1810. From a Germanic language; compare English trip.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

trepar (first-person singular present trepo, first-person singular preterite trepei, past participle trepado)

  1. to trample, to tread

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Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

From the onomatopoeia trep or trip or from Germanic.[1]

Pronunciation edit

 
 

  • Hyphenation: tre‧par

Verb edit

trepar (first-person singular present trepo, first-person singular preterite trepei, past participle trepado)

  1. to climb
  2. to mount
  3. to tread on
  4. (slang, Brazil) to fuck

Conjugation edit

References edit

  1. ^ trepar” in Dicionário infopédia da Língua Portuguesa. Porto: Porto Editora, 2003–2024.

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Onomatopoeic in origin.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /tɾeˈpaɾ/ [t̪ɾeˈpaɾ]
  • Rhymes: -aɾ
  • Syllabification: tre‧par

Verb edit

trepar (first-person singular present trepo, first-person singular preterite trepé, past participle trepado)

  1. to clamber, to scramble, to scramble up, to shimmy up (using both hands and feet)
  2. to climb over (when meaning climb "over", it's usually over something vertical like a wall)
  3. to climb, to climb up, to scale
    Synonyms: escalar, subir
  4. to creep, to climb (e.g. a plant or tree)
  5. (figuratively) to climb (the social ladder)

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Anagrams edit