CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Backformed from trepant.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

trepar (first-person singular present trepo, past participle trepat)

  1. to drill, bore

ConjugationEdit

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GalicianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Attested since 1810. From a Germanic language; confer English trip.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

trepar (first-person singular present trepo, first-person singular preterite trepei, past participle trepado)

  1. to trample, to tread

ConjugationEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the onomatopoeia trep or trip or from Germanic.[1]

PronunciationEdit

 
  • IPA(key): (Brazil) /tɾeˈpa(ʁ)/, [tɾeˈpa(h)]
    • IPA(key): (São Paulo) /tɾeˈpa(ɾ)/, [tɾeˈpa(ɾ)]
    • IPA(key): (Rio) /tɾeˈpa(ʁ)/, [tɾeˈpa(χ)]
  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /tɾɨˈpaɾ/, [tɾɨˈpaɾ]

  • Hyphenation: tre‧par

VerbEdit

trepar (first-person singular present indicative trepo, past participle trepado)

  1. to climb
  2. to mount
  3. to tread on
  4. (slang, Brazil) to fuck

ConjugationEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ trepar” in Dicionário infopédia da Língua Portuguesa. Porto: Porto Editora, 2003–2021.

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Onomatopoetic in origin.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tɾeˈpaɾ/, [t̪ɾeˈpaɾ]

VerbEdit

trepar (first-person singular present trepo, first-person singular preterite trepé, past participle trepado)

  1. to clamber, to scramble, to scramble up, to shimmy up (using both hands and feet)
  2. to climb over (when meaning climb "over", it's usually over something vertical like a wall)
  3. to climb, to climb up, to scale
    Synonyms: escalar, subir
  4. to creep, to climb (e.g. a plant or tree)
  5. (figuratively) to climb (the social ladder)

ConjugationEdit

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AnagramsEdit