See also: Tunnel

EnglishEdit

 
a tunnel [1-2] in Wuppertal

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French tonnelle (net) or tonel (cask), diminutive of Old French tonne (cask), a word of uncertain origin and affiliation. Related to Old English tunne (tun; cask; barrel). More at tun.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtʌn(ə)l/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌnəl
  • Hyphenation: tun‧nel

NounEdit

tunnel (plural tunnels)

  1. An underground or underwater passage.
    • 2012, Andrew Martin, Underground Overground: A passenger's history of the Tube, Profile Books, →ISBN, page 90:
      In 1865 an outfit called the East London Railway Company bought the Brunel tunnel for £800,000, and in 1869 they opened a railway through it.
  2. A passage through or under some obstacle.
    • 1922, Margery Williams, The Velveteen Rabbit
      But very soon he grew to like it, for the Boy used to talk to him, and made nice tunnels for him under the bedclothes that he said were like the burrows the real rabbits lived in.
    • 2020 August 26, Tim Dunn, “Great railway bores of our time!”, in Rail, page 42:
      There are more than 1,500 railway tunnels in Britain and the majority are still in use, carrying working tracks beneath Britain's most inconvenient geographic features.
  3. A hole in the ground made by an animal, a burrow.
  4. (computing, networking) A wrapper for a protocol that cannot otherwise be used because it is unsupported, blocked, or insecure.
  5. A vessel with a broad mouth at one end, a pipe or tube at the other, for conveying liquor, fluids, etc., into casks, bottles, or other vessels; a funnel.
  6. The opening of a chimney for the passage of smoke; a flue.
  7. (mining) A level passage driven across the measures, or at right angles to veins which it is desired to reach; distinguished from the drift, or gangway, which is led along the vein when reached by the tunnel.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

tunnel (third-person singular simple present tunnels, present participle (UK) tunnelling or (US) tunneling, simple past and past participle (UK) tunnelled or (US) tunneled)

  1. (transitive) To make a tunnel through or under something; to burrow.
    • 2019 October, Ruth Bagley tells James Abbott, “Crunch time for Heathrow western link”, in Modern Railways, page 74:
      The 6.5km route is agreed from a junction with the relief lines of the Great Western main line to the west of Slough, the new link would tunnel under the M25 to reach Heathrow's Terminal 5 station, where space has been set aside to accommodate services from the west.
  2. (intransitive) To dig a tunnel.
  3. (computing, networking) To transmit something through a tunnel (wrapper for insecure or unsupported protocol).
  4. (transitive, medicine) To insert a catheter into a vein to allow long-term use.
  5. (physics) To undergo the quantum-mechanical phenomenon where a particle penetrates through a barrier that it classically cannot surmount.

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

NounEdit

tunnel c (definite singular tunnelen or tunnellen, indefinite plural tunneler or tunneller, definite plural tunnelerne or tunnellerne)

  1. tunnel

Derived termsEdit


DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English tunnel, from Middle French tonnelle.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtʏ.nəl/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: tun‧nel

NounEdit

tunnel m (plural tunnels, diminutive tunneltje n)

  1. tunnel

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English tunnel, itself a borrowing from French tonnelle; hence a reborrowing. Doublet of tonnelle.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tunnel m (plural tunnels)

  1. tunnel

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English tunnel.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈt̪un.nel], /ˈtunnel/
  • Hyphenation: tùn‧nel

NounEdit

tunnel m (invariable)

  1. tunnel
    Synonyms: galleria, traforo

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

tunnel m (definite singular tunnelen, indefinite plural tunneler, definite plural tunnelene)

  1. a tunnel
  2. (soccer) nutmeg

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English tunnel, Middle French tonnelle (net) or tonel (cask), diminutive of Old French tonne (cask), a word of uncertain origin and affiliation.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tʉˈnɛlː/, /ˈtʉnːɛl/

NounEdit

tunnel m (definite singular tunnelen, indefinite plural tunnelar, definite plural tunnelane)

  1. a tunnel
  2. (soccer) nutmeg

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tunnel c

  1. tunnel
    1. An underground or underwater passage.
    2. A passage through or under some obstacle.
    3. A hole in the ground made by an animal, a burrow.

DeclensionEdit

Declension of tunnel 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative tunnel tunneln tunnlar tunnlarna
Genitive tunnels tunnelns tunnlars tunnlarnas

Related termsEdit