See also: WOs, wós, woš, W.O.s, and Woś

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

wos

  1. Eye dialect spelling of was.
    • 1876, Edward Everett Hale, "Phillip Nolan's Friends; or, 'Show Your Passports!'", Scribner's Monthly, Vol. XII, No. 1, page 20[1]:
      She wos real good to 'em all, she wos, ma'am.

AnagramsEdit


CatawbaEdit

EtymologyEdit

The word is related to wus, wuss (wasp).

NounEdit

wos

  1. bee

JavaneseEdit

Other scripts
Carakan ꦮꦺꦴꦱ꧀
Roman wos

EtymologyEdit

From Old Javanese wĕas, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *bəʀas, from Proto-Austronesian *bəʀas (husked rice).

NounEdit

wos (ngoko beras, krama wos)

  1. uncooked rice
  2. essence; contents; gist of the matter

Further readingEdit

  • “[ wos]” in Bausastra Jawa, Yogyakarta: The Linguistic Center of Yogyakarta [Balai Bahasa Provinsi Yogyakarta].

Lower SorbianEdit

NounEdit

wos f (diminutive woska)

  1. Superseded spelling of wós.

DeclensionEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

PronounEdit

wos

  1. Alternative form of whos (whose, genitive)

Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *wōsą, from Proto-Indo-European *weys- (to flow). Akin to Middle Low German wose (foam; froth), Old English wāse (marsh; mire).

NounEdit

wōs n (nominative plural wōs)

  1. juice, sap; moisture
DeclensionEdit
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Middle English: wos, wose

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected forms.

NounEdit

wōs

  1. genitive singular of wōh

Tok PisinEdit

NounEdit

wos

  1. sentinel