See also: , , , , and
U+7740, 着
CJK UNIFIED IDEOGRAPH-7740

[U+773F]
CJK Unified Ideographs
[U+7741]

U+FAAA, 着
CJK COMPATIBILITY IDEOGRAPH-FAAA

[U+FAA9]
CJK Compatibility Ideographs
[U+FAAB]

Translingual

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Stroke order
Mainland China
 
Stroke order
(Chinese)
 
Stroke order
(Japan)
 
Japanese
Simplified
Traditional /着

Alternative forms

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  • In mainland China, the top component is written (the 丿 stroke is not split into two strokes).
  • In Hong Kong, Japan and Korea, the top component is written 𦍌 followed by 丿 (split into two separate components).
  • A CJK compatibility ideograph exists at U+FAAA for the alternative form used in Taiwan that resembles the form used in Hong Kong/Japan/Korea that is written with 12 strokes.

Han character

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(Kangxi radical 109, +7 in traditional Chinese, Japanese and Korean, 目+6 in mainland China, 12 strokes in traditional Chinese, Japanese and Korean, 11 strokes in mainland China, cangjie input 廿手月山 (TQBU), four-corner 80605, composition (GT or U+FAAA) or 𦍌丿(HJK))

Usage notes

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This character is not found in the authoritative Kangxi dictionary. See glyph origin below.

In Japan this character is usually classified under radical 123, .

Derived characters

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References

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  • Kangxi Dictionary: not present, would follow page 808, character 5
  • Dai Kanwa Jiten: character 23339
  • Hanyu Da Zidian (first edition): volume 5, page 3129, character 9
  • Unihan data for U+7740

Chinese

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Glyph origin

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Corrupted variant of (; ()). Recorded as an unorthodox form (俗字) in the Tang dynasty orthographic dictionary Ganlu Zishu 干祿字書.

Later dictionaries such as the Ming dynasty 《字學三正》 and Qing dynasty Zhengzitong 正字通 recorded the glyph as ⿱𦍌⿰丿目.

Definitions

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For pronunciation and definitions of – see (“to attach to; to stick to; to adhere to; etc.”).
(This character is the simplified and variant traditional form of ).
Notes:

Usage notes

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is both the standard and variant traditional character of some senses of (Pronunciations 1 and 2). In Hong Kong, (zoek3/zoek6) and (zyu3) are both used and represent different meanings.

In mainland China's Table of General Standard Chinese Characters (通用规范汉字表), (zhù) is not listed as a traditional form of and is considered a separate character.

References

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Japanese

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Kanji

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(grade 3 “Kyōiku” kanji)

  1. to arrive
  2. to wear

Readings

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Compounds

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Etymology 1

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Kanji in this term
ちゃく
Grade: 3
kan’on

From Middle Chinese (MC trjak).

First cited as an independent noun from the early 1700s.[1]

Pronunciation

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Counter

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(ちゃく) (-chaku

  1. used to count suits of clothing or individual garments
  2. used to count arrivals

Noun

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(ちゃく) (chaku

  1. [from 1748] arrival at a location
  2. [from 1712] (archaic) the wearing of clothing
  3. [from 1871] (archaic) a kimono
  4. [from 1768] (archaic, possibly obsolete) in the area around Edo, short for 巾着切り (kinchaku kiri, a cutpurse).

Etymology 2

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Kanji in this term
き > ぎ
Grade: 3
kun’yomi

From the (れん)(よう)(けい) (ren'yōkei, stem or continuative form) of the verb 着る. Ultimately from Proto-Japonic *ki. The ki changes to gi as an instance of rendaku (連濁).

Pronunciation

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Suffix

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() (-gi

  1. clothes, outfit, uniform

References

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  1. ^ Shōgaku Tosho (1988) 国語大辞典(新装版) [Unabridged Dictionary of Japanese (Revised Edition)] (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Shogakukan, →ISBN
  2. ^ Matsumura, Akira, editor (2006), 大辞林 [Daijirin] (in Japanese), Third edition, Tokyo: Sanseidō, →ISBN
  3. ^ NHK Broadcasting Culture Research Institute, editor (1998), NHK日本語発音アクセント辞典 [NHK Japanese Pronunciation Accent Dictionary] (in Japanese), Tokyo: NHK Publishing, Inc., →ISBN

Korean

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Hanja

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(eumhun 붙을 (buteul chak))

  1. Hanja form? of (arriving; wearing).

Vietnamese

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Han character

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: Hán Nôm readings: trước, trứ, chốc, trốc

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

References

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