See also: nj, Nj, NJ, nJ, and N.J.

Egyptian edit

Etymology 1 edit

.n (we, us, our) +‎ -j (dual marker).

Pronunciation edit

 

Pronoun edit

n
y

 du 1. suffix pronoun

  1. we two, us two, ours (see usage notes)
Usage notes edit

This form is rare in Middle Egyptian; it is more usual to use the plural, .n.

This form of pronoun attaches directly to the preceding word, and means different things depending on what it is attached to.

  • When attached to a noun, it indicates the possessor of the noun.
  • When attached to a verb of the suffix conjugation, it indicates the subject of the verb.
  • When attached to an infinitive verb (especially of an intransitive verb) whose subject is not otherwise expressed, it indicates the subject of the verb.
  • When attached to a transitive infinitive verb whose subject is otherwise expressed or omitted, it indicates the object of the verb.
  • In the third person, when attached to a prospective participle, it indicates gender and number agreement.
  • When attached to a particle like jw or a parenthetic like ḫr, it indicates the subject of the clause.
  • When attached to a preposition, it indicates the object of the preposition.
  • When it follows a relative adjective such as ntj or ntt, it indicates the subject of the relative clause (except in the first person singular and third person common).
Inflection edit
Alternative forms edit

Etymology 2 edit

.n (perfect suffix) +‎ -j (adverbializing suffix).

Pronunciation edit

Suffix edit

n
y
  1. Sometimes used to form the perfect of verbs when the subject is omitted.

References edit

  1. ^ Loprieno, Antonio (1995) Ancient Egyptian: A Linguistic Introduction, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 64