Contents

TranslingualEdit

Unicode name LATIN SMALL LETTER N
Unicode block Basic Latin
Codepoint U+006E
m ← Basic Latin → o

EtymologyEdit

From the old Latin N, from the Greek Ν (nu), from an archaic reversed Greek N, from the Phoenician symbol; possibly from an earlier Egyptian hieroglyph of a serpent.

LetterEdit

n lower case (upper case N)

  1. The fourteenth letter of the basic modern Latin alphabet.
  2. in Romanization:
    1. of the Hebrew נ \ ן ‎(nun”, “nūn) in the Common Israeli, Hebrew Academy (1953 and 2006), and ISO 259 transliteration schemes
    2. of the Hebrew נּ ‎(nun”, “nūn ḥāzāq) in the Common Israeli transliteration scheme

SynonymsEdit

  • (Romanization of נּ, “nun”, “nūn ḥāzāq”): nn (in the Hebrew Academy (1953 and 2006) and ISO 259 transliteration schemes)

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Other representations of N:

External linksEdit

PronunciationEdit

SymbolEdit

n

  1. (IPA) alveolar nasal.
  2. (statistics) Sample size.
  3. (physics) neutron
  4. (mathematics) An arbitrary natural number.

External linksEdit


EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

(file)

LetterEdit

n ‎(lower case, upper case N, plural n's)

  1. The fourteenth letter of the English alphabet, called en and written in the Latin script.
See alsoEdit

NumberEdit

n ‎(lower case, upper case N)

  1. The ordinal number fourteenth, derived from this letter of the English alphabet, called en and written in the Latin script.

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

n

  1. north
  2. (grammar) noun
  3. (grammar) neuter gender
  4. (organic chemistry) normal
  5. Neutral
  6. No
  7. Shortening of and, used in set phrases like rock-n-roll.
TranslationsEdit

AromanianEdit

PrepositionEdit

n

  1. Alternative form of ãn

AzeriEdit

LetterEdit

n lower case (upper case N)

  1. The twentieth letter of the Azeri alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

n ‎(lower case, upper case N)

  1. The fourteenth letter of the Dutch alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit

  • Previous letter: m
  • Next letter: o

See alsoEdit


EgyptianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

  1. of

Usage notesEdit

This genitival adjective is used to express the indirect genitive. It indicates that the noun preceding it (with which it agrees in gender and number), is possessed by the noun which follows it.

InflectionEdit

Masculine Feminine
Singular n
nt

Plural nw

nt

PrepositionEdit

  1. to, for (dative)
  2. towards
  3. (of time) for, until
  4. because of

Usage notesEdit

Before a noun it can be written

nj

This should not be confused with the negative particle, which is written identically

InflectionEdit

Adverbial forms nj

n(j)

PronounEdit


Dependent pronoun: first person plural

  1. we, us (see usage notes)

Usage notesEdit

This form of pronoun is an enclitic, which must directly follow the word it modifies. Its meaning depends on its context.

  • When it follows a verb, it indicates the object of the verb
  • In the second and third person when it follows an adjective, it forms the subject of an adjectival sentance
  • When it follows a relative adjective, such as ntj, ntt, and jsṯ, it indicates the subject of the relative clause (Usually only in the first person singular and third person neuter)
  • When it follows an imperative, it indicates the object of the verb.
  • When it follows a particle like mj.k, it indicates the subject of the clause.
  • When attached to a preposition, it indicates the object of the preposition


This pronoun has a variant hieroglyphic writing:

n

InflectionEdit

Dependent pronouns inflect for gender and number. The "neuter" third person form is used for inanimate objects. See individual pages for variant writings.

Singular Plural
1st person wj n
2nd masculine ṯw / tw ṯn / tn
2nd feminine ṯn / tn
3rd masculine sw sn
3rd feminine sj
3rd neuter st

ReferencesEdit

Allen, Middle Egyptian
Faulkner, A Concise Dictionary of Middle Egyptian


EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

n ‎(lower case, upper case N)

  1. The eighteenth letter of the Esperanto alphabet, called no and written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


FaroeseEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

n ‎(upper case N)

  1. The sixteenth letter of the Faroese alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

LetterEdit

n ‎(lower case, upper case N)

  1. The fourteenth letter of the French alphabet, written in the Latin script.
    • 1837, Louis Viardot, L’Ingénieux Hidalgo Don Quichotte de la Manchefr.Wikisource, translation of El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Chapter I:
      Avec ces propos et d’autres semblables, le pauvre gentilhomme perdait le jugement. Il passait les nuits et se donnait la torture pour les comprendre, pour les approfondir, pour leur tirer le sens des entrailles, ce qu’Aristote lui-même n’aurait pu faire, s’il fût ressuscité tout exprès pour cela.
      With these passages and other similar ones, the poor gentleman lost his judgement. He spent his nights and tortured himself to understand them, to consider them more deeply, to take from them their deepest meaning, which Aristotle himself would not have been able to do, had he been resurrected for that very purpose.

GermanEdit

ArticleEdit

n

  1. Nonstandard form of 'n.
    • 1984, Wolfdietrich Schnurre, Ein Unglücksfall: Roman, page 172:
      „Hat uns vorhin so n Mensch von der Dingsbums gebracht.“ „Von der Kultusgemeinde.“ Avrom hebt zwinkernd die Augen vom Buch; er lächelt. Muß ne anrührende Stelle gewesen sein, was er da grade liest. „Was heißt ‚so n Mensch‘.“
    • 1999, Regula Schmidlin, Wie Deutschschweizer Kinder schreiben und erzählen lernen:
      [] also die Geschichte hab ich genannt (äh) die Froschsuche weil da war so n Junge und mit em Hund und die haben dauernd ihren Frosch immer angeguckt im Wasser und dann einmal in der Nacht is er weggehüpft []
    • 2012, Gustav Falke, Die Kinder Aus Ohlsens Gang, page 92:
       »Wenn ick de jungen Lüd nich harr und de Kinner – so n Mann, Herr Lehrer, so n Mann! aber ick hev en nu. He schall mi mol Muck seggn. Rut smiet ick em.« »Das lassen Sie nur lieber nach, Frau Krahnstöver. [] «
    • 2014, Manuel Mayer, Schwule Akten: Fußballstar und Tennisprofi geoutet (Himmelstürmer Verlag), page 58:
      Und da Sex Sponsoren anzieht, würde so n Kerl ein so großes Medienecho hervorrufen, sodass wir noch Jahrhunderte davon hören würden ...

IdoEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

n ‎(upper case N)

  1. The fourteenth letter of the Ido alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

n m, f ‎(invariable)

  1. See under N

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

n

  1. rōmaji reading of
  2. rōmaji reading of

LadinEdit

ArticleEdit

n

  1. a (+ masculine noun)

See alsoEdit


LatvianEdit

Latvian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia lv

EtymologyEdit

Proposed in 1908 as part of the new Latvian spelling by the scientific commission headed by K. Mīlenbahs, which was accepted and began to be taught in schools in 1909. Prior to that, Latvian had been written in German Fraktur, and sporadically in Cyrillic.

PronunciationEdit

(file)

LetterEdit

N

n ‎(lower case, upper case N)

  1. The twenty-first letter of the Latvian alphabet, called en and written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


LivonianEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

n ‎(upper case N)

  1. The twentieth letter of the Livonian alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit



MalayEdit

LetterEdit

n ‎(lower case, upper case N)

  1. The fourteenth letter of the Malay alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


NorwegianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (letter name): IPA(key): /enː/, /ɛnː/
  • (phoneme): IPA(key): /n/, /ɳ/*, /ŋ/*

LetterEdit

n

  1. The fourteenth letter of the Norwegian alphabet, written in the Latin script.

Usage notesEdit

  • /ɳ/ Retroflex, merge of rn.
  • /ŋ/ Velar nasal, merge of ng, and when n comes before k, like in the English think.

PortugueseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

n ‎(lower case, upper case N)

  1. The fourteenth letter of the Portuguese alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Alternative formsEdit

AdverbEdit

n

  1. (Internet slang, text messaging) Abbreviation of não ‎(not).

NounEdit

n m (plural n)

  1. (Internet slang, text messaging) Abbreviation of não ‎(no).

InterjectionEdit

n

  1. (Internet slang, text messaging) Abbreviation of não ‎(no).

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

n ‎(lowercase, capital N)

  1. The seventeenth letter of the Romanian alphabet, written in the Latin script. Representing the phoneme /n/. Preceded by m and followed by o.

Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

n (Cyrillic spelling н)

  1. The 19th letter of the Serbo-Croatian Latin alphabet, preceded by m and followed by nj.

Skolt SamiEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

n ‎(upper case N)

  1. The twenty-second letter of the Skolt Sami alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (phoneme) IPA(key): /n/, /ŋ/, /ɱ/, /n̪/, /n̟/, /n̪/, /nʲ/, /ɴ/
  • (letter) IPA(key): /'ene/
    • (file)

LetterEdit

n ‎(lower case, upper case N)

  1. The fourteenth letter of the Spanish alphabet, written in the Latin script.

TurkishEdit

LetterEdit

n ‎(lower case, upper case N)

  1. The seventeenth letter of the Turkish alphabet, called ne and written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


TurkmenEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

n ‎(upper case N)

  1. The sixteenth letter of the Turkmen alphabet, called en and written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit

Read in another language