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Contents

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

1784,[1] borrowed from Hindi अवतार (avtār) or from Urdu اوتار(avatār), both borrowed from Sanskrit अवतार (ava-tāra, descent of a deity from a heaven), a compound of अव (ava, off, away, down) and the vṛddhi-stem of the root तरति (√tṝ, to cross).

In computing use, saw some use in 1980s videos games – 1985 online role-playing game Habitat by Lucasfilm Games (today LucasArts), by Chip Morningstar and Randy Farmer,[2] later versions of the Ultima series (following religious use in 1985 Ultima IV: Quest of the Avatar), and 1989 pen and paper role-playing game Shadowrun. Popularized by 1992 novel Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌæv.əˈtɑ/, /ˈæv.ə.tɑ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈæv.ə.tɑɹ/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: av‧a‧tar

NounEdit

avatar (plural avatars)

  1. (Hinduism) the incarnation of a deity, particularly Vishnu.
  2. The physical embodiment of an idea or concept; a personification.
    • 1886, Robert Louis Stevenson, dedicatory letter to Kidnapped [contrasting the historical Alan Breac with his incarnation in the novel].
      And honest Alan, who was a grim fire-eater in his day, has in this new avatar no more desperate purpose than to steal some young gentleman's attention from his Ovid...
  3. (computing or video games) A digital representation of a person or being; often, it can take on any of various forms, as a participant chooses. e.g. 3D, animated, photo, sketch of a person or a person's alter ego, sometimes used in a virtual world or virtual chat room.
    • 1992 Neal Stephenson, Snow Crash
      The people are pieces of software called avatars. They are the audiovisual bodies that people use to communicate with each other in the Metaverse.
    • 2013 November 27, Roger Cohen, “The past in our future [print version: International Herald Tribune Magazine, 2013, p. 21]”, in The New York Times[1]:
      Devices now track and record our every move and, whether we like it or not, each one of us will bequeath to posterity a virtual avatar, a digital being whose calls, messages, transactions, loves and losses will live on in a vast, unregulated cyberspace. The afterlife has arrived, at least for our cyberbeings.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

  Avatar on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 avatar” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.
  2. ^ Morabito, Margaret. "Enter the Online World of LucasFilm." Run Aug. 1986: 24-28

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Hindustani (Hindi-Urdu) अवतार (avtār) / اوتار(avatār), from Sanskrit अवतार (ava-tāra, descent of a deity from a heaven), a compound of अव (ava, off, away, down) and the vṛddhi-stem of the root तरति (√tṝ, to cross).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

avatar m (plural avatars)

  1. (religion, hinduism) avatar
  2. (computing) avatar

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

avatar m (invariable)

  1. avatar (all senses)

AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

avatar m

  1. avatar

Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /aʋǎtaːr/
  • Hyphenation: a‧va‧tar

NounEdit

avàtār m (Cyrillic spelling ава̀та̄р)

  1. avatar

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

avatar m (plural avatares)

  1. avatar