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EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin digitālis, from digitus (finger, toe) + -alis (-al).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɪd͡ʒɪtəɫ/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

digital (not comparable)

  1. Having to do with digits (fingers or toes); performed with a finger.
  2. Property of representing values as discrete, usually binary, numbers rather than a continuous spectrum.
    • 2013 July-August, Catherine Clabby, “Focus on Everything”, in American Scientist:
      Not long ago, it was difficult to produce photographs of tiny creatures with every part in focus. [] A photo processing technique called focus stacking has changed that. Developed as a tool to electronically combine the sharpest bits of multiple digital images, focus stacking is a boon to biologists seeking full focus on a micron scale.
    digital computer;  digital clock
  3. Of or relating to computers or the Information Age.
    Digital payment systems are replacing cash transactions.

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

NounEdit

digital (countable and uncountable, plural digitals)

  1. (finance) A digital option.
  2. (uncountable) Digital equipment or technology.
    He moved to digital for the first time, using a Sony camera.
  3. (music) Any of the keys of a piano or similar instrument.
    • c.1920?, Annie Jessy Gregg Curwen, The Teacher's Guide to Mrs. Curwen's Pianoforte Method (The Child Pianist)
      Beginning with the keyboard, direct attention to the grouping of the black digitals, and show that though at the outer edge of the keyboard the white digitals look as if they were all equally close neighbours, yet, []
  4. (colloquial, humorous) A finger.
    • 1853, Yankee Notions (volume 2, page 137)
      [] turning round as he reached the door, he placed his digitals in close proximity to his proboscis, saying—“I guess there an't anything green about this child!' and left the Professor in utter astonishment []
    • 1855, North Carolina University Magazine (volume 3, page 23)
      [] with grave complacency wiggles his digitals, and turns away with a scornful smile playing upon his countenance.

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin digitālis. Doublet of didal, which was inherited.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

digital (masculine and feminine plural digitals)

  1. digital

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin digitālis. Doublet of .

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

digital (feminine singular digitale, masculine plural digitaux, feminine plural digitales)

  1. of or pertaining to fingers or toes
  2. digital

Usage notesEdit

digital is occasionally used in French to describe display devices such as TV screens. Its use for other purposes is often criticised, because this use derives from English, and because digital more commonly has the first meaning above. See also numérique

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

digital (not comparable)

  1. (computing) digital
  2. (medicine) digital

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin digitālis, from digitus (finger, toe) + -ālis (-al).

AdjectiveEdit

digital m

  1. (Jersey) digital

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin digitalis, via English digital.

AdjectiveEdit

digital (neuter singular digitalt, definite singular and plural digitale)

  1. digital

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin digitalis, via English digital

AdjectiveEdit

digital (neuter singular digitalt, definite singular and plural digitale)

  1. digital

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin digitālis. Doublet of dedal, which was inherited.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

digital m or f (plural digitais, comparable)

  1. digital; having to do with the fingers or toes
  2. dealing with discrete values rather than a continuous spectrum of values
  3. dealing with the display of numerical values

Derived termsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French digital.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

digital m or n (feminine singular digitală, masculine plural digitali, feminine and neuter plural digitale)

  1. digital (having to do with fingers or toes)
  2. digital (dealing with discrete values rather than a continuous spectrum of values)

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin digitālis. Doublet of dedal, which was inherited.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dixiˈtal/, [d̪ixiˈt̪al]
  • Hyphenation: di‧gi‧tal

AdjectiveEdit

digital (plural digitales)

  1. digital; having to do with the fingers or toes
  2. digital; dealing with discrete values rather than a continuous spectrum of values
  3. digital; dealing with the display of numerical values

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

digital f (plural digitales)

  1. foxglove (plant, flower)

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin digitālis, via English digital.

AdjectiveEdit

digital (not comparable)

  1. digital; in (or using) digital (and electronic) form

Usage notesEdit

  • Circa 2010, the word took on a wider definition, meaning electronic, modern, or binary (having only two values); digitalisering (digitization) started to being used not only of signals, information and documents (e.g. digitizing books or patient's journals), but also about enterprises, as a synonym to automation, computerization (e.g. digitizing libraries and hospitals).

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of digital
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular digital
Neuter singular digitalt
Plural digitala
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 digitale
All digitala
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.

Related termsEdit