Open main menu

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin apud (at, by, in the presence of, in the writings of).

PrepositionEdit

apud

  1. Used in scholarly works to cite a reference at second hand
    Jones apud Smith means that the original source is Jones, but that the author is relying on Smith for that reference.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • apud at OneLook Dictionary Search

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin apud.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /ˈapud/
  • Hyphenation: a‧pud

PrepositionEdit

apud

  1. near
    • 1910, L. L. Zamenhof, "Proverbaro Esperanta":
      Apud propra domo ŝtelisto ne ŝtelas.
      A thief doesn't steal near their own house.
  2. next to, beside, alongside, adjacent to
    • 1910, L. L. Zamenhof, "Proverbaro Esperanta":
      Apud plena manĝotablo ĉiu estas tre afabla.
      Next to a full table of food, everyone is very friendly.

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

  • cis (on this side of)
  • ĉe (at)
  • trans (across, on the other side of)

IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Esperanto apud, from Latin apud.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

apud

  1. next to, beside, by, immediate vicinity
    La glaso es apud la krucho.
    The glass is next to the picher.

SynonymsEdit

  • an (at, on (indicates contiguity, juxtaposition))
  • che (at, in, to)

AntonymsEdit

  • for (far from, away from)

Derived termsEdit

  • apuda (adjacent, near, neighboring)
  • apude (adjacently)

InterlinguaEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

apud

  1. next to; together with

LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Seems connected with ob and ad, thus its strict meaning would be "on to", "unto".

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

apud (+ accusative)

  1. at, by, near, among
  2. chez (at the house of)
  3. before, in the presence of, in the writings of, in view of
    • Pliny the Elder
      Librōs...nātōs apud mē...
      [These] books [that] I have completed (completed in the writings of myself).

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • apud in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • apud in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • apud in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • apud in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be popular with; to stand well with a person: gratiosum esse alicui or apud aliquem
    • to be popular with; to stand well with a person: in gratia esse apud aliquem
    • to be highly favoured by; to be influential with..: multum valere gratia apud aliquem
    • to gain a person's esteem, friendship: gratiam inire ab aliquoor apud aliquem
    • to have great influence with a person; to have considerable weight: multum auctoritate valere, posse apud aliquem
    • to have great influence with a person; to have considerable weight: magna auctoritas alicuius est apud aliquem
    • to have great influence with a person; to have considerable weight: alicuius auctoritas multum valet apud aliquem
    • to be honoured, esteemed by some one: esse in honore apud aliquem
    • the matter speaks for itself: res ipsa (pro me apud te) loquitur
    • we read in history: apud rerum scriptores scriptum videmus, scriptum est
    • in Sophocles' Ajax: in Sophoclis (not Sophoclea) Aiace or apud Sophoclem in Aiace
    • to address a meeting of the people: verba facere apud populum, in contione
    • to introduce a person (into a dialogue) discoursing on..: aliquem disputantem facere, inducere, fingere (est aliquid apud aliquem disputans)
    • to speak on a subject: verba facere (de aliqua re, apud aliquem)
    • we have no expression for that: huic rei deest apud nos vocabulum
    • we read in Plato: apud Platonem scriptum videmus, scriptum est or simply est
    • to lose one's head, be beside oneself: non esse apud se (Plaut. Mil. 4. 8. 26)
    • to be hated by some one: in odio esse apud aliquem
    • to hurt some one's feelings: offendere apud aliquem (Cluent. 23. 63)
    • to be in the lower world: apud inferos esse
    • I felt quite at home in his house: apud eum sic fui tamquam domi meae (Fam. 13. 69)
    • to be at some one's house: apud aliquem esse
    • to live in some one's house: habitare in domo alicuius, apud aliquem (Acad. 2. 36. 115)
    • to stop with a person, be his guest for a short time when travelling: deversari apud aliquem (Att. 6. 1. 25)
    • to gain some one's favour: gratiam inire apud aliquem, ab aliquo (cf. sect. V. 12)
    • to conduct a person's case (said of an agent, solicitor): causam alicuius agere (apud iudicem)
    • to accuse, denounce a person: nomen alicuius deferre (apud praetorem) (Verr. 2. 38. 94)
    • to harangue the soldiers: contionari apud milites (B. C. 1. 7)
    • to harangue the soldiers: contionem habere apud milites
  • apud in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016

PortugueseEdit

PrepositionEdit

apud

  1. apud (introduces an indirect citation)