See also: Biga, bigă, and bigą

English edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin bīga.

Noun edit

biga (plural bigas or bigae)

  1. (historical) A Roman racing chariot drawn by two horses abreast.

Translations edit

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Basque edit

Noun edit

biga ?

  1. calf

Numeral edit

biga

  1. two

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Uncertain; probably from Latin bīga (tree-trunk). Cognate with Portuguese viga, Spanish viga, Occitan biga.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

biga f (plural bigues)

  1. beam, as in a large piece of wood or metal serving a structural role in a building

Further reading edit

Cebuano edit

Noun edit

biga

  1. semen
  2. pre-ejaculate
  3. lust; a feeling of strong desire, especially such a feeling driven by sexual arousal

Verb edit

biga

  1. to be in heat
  2. to be randy; to feel horny
  3. to lust

Italian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin bīga.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbi.ɡa/
  • Rhymes: -iɡa
  • Hyphenation: bì‧ga

Noun edit

biga f (plural bighe)

  1. (historical) chariot (two-wheeled)
  2. (baking) pre-ferment sponge, similar to poolish (bread starter)
    • 2018, Piergiorgio Giorilli, Il grande libro del pane, Kindle edition, Milan: Gribaudo, →ISBN:
      Gli impasti a base di biga hanno particolari proprietà viscoso-elastiche e risultano particolarmente lisci ed estensibili. [] Infatti spesso per realizzare le ricette, come pasta dura o pane pugliese, vengono utilizzate tutte e due, sia biga sia pasta di riporto, in modo da sfruttare le peculiarità di ambedue le paste.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)

Derived terms edit

Jamaican Creole edit

Adjective edit

biga

  1. comparative degree of big

Latin edit

Etymology edit

bi- +‎ iuga

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bīga f (genitive bīgae); first declension

  1. chariot (two-wheeled)
  2. (in the plural) pair of horses

Usage notes edit

Exclusively used in the plural in pre-Augustan Latin. Seneca and Pliny were the first writers to use it in the singular.

Declension edit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative bīga bīgae
Genitive bīgae bīgārum
Dative bīgae bīgīs
Accusative bīgam bīgās
Ablative bīgā bīgīs
Vocative bīga bīgae

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Albanian: bigë
  • Aromanian: bigã
  • Catalan: biga
  • English: biga
  • Italian: biga
  • Occitan: biga
  • Polish: biga
  • Portuguese: biga
  • Romanian: bigă
  • Spanish: viga

References edit

  • biga”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • biga in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • biga”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898), Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • biga”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890), A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Laz edit

Noun edit

biga

  1. Latin spelling of ბიგა (biga)

Old High German edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Related to Old Norse bingr (heap) (English bing), from a Proto-Germanic derivative of Proto-Indo-European *bʰenǵʰ- (thick), see also Sanskrit बहुल (bahula, abundant).[1]

Noun edit

bīga f

  1. pile, heap

Descendants edit

References edit

  1. ^ Buck, C. D. (2008). A Dictionary of Selected Synonyms in the Principal Indo-European Languages. United States: University of Chicago Press, p. 887

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl
 
biga

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbi.ɡa/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iɡa
  • Syllabification: bi‧ga
  • Homophone: Biga

Etymology 1 edit

Learned borrowing from Latin bīga. First attested in the first half of the 19th century.[1]

Noun edit

biga f

  1. (Ancient Rome, historical) biga (Roman racing chariot drawn by two horses abreast)

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from German biegen. Doublet of Boh and Bug.

Noun edit

biga f

  1. (printing) crease (element of the die-cutting machine used to emboss the bend line of the paper)
Declension edit

References edit

  1. ^ biga in Narodowy Fotokorpus Języka Polskiego

Further reading edit

  • biga in Polish dictionaries at PWN
  • biga in PWN's encyclopedia

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin biga.

Pronunciation edit

 

  • Hyphenation: bi‧ga

Noun edit

biga f (plural bigas)

  1. chariot (type of vehicle)

Romanian edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

biga f

  1. definite nominative/accusative singular of bigă

Sardinian edit

Etymology edit

Probably from Latin bīga (tree-trunk)

Noun edit

biga

  1. (Campidanese) beam

Tagalog edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Spanish viga.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bigà or biga (Baybayin spelling ᜊᜒᜄ)

  1. (carpentry) girder
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bigà (Baybayin spelling ᜊᜒᜄ)

  1. giant taro (Alocasia macrorrhizos)
    Synonyms: malabiga, badyang

Etymology 3 edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bigà (Baybayin spelling ᜊᜒᜄ)

  1. flat lowland
    Synonyms: lambak, libis

Etymology 4 edit

Possibly Chinese.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bigà (Baybayin spelling ᜊᜒᜄ)

  1. damp or swampy ground
    Synonyms: labon, latian, tanlak, tunlak

Etymology 5 edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bigà (Baybayin spelling ᜊᜒᜄ)

  1. root of words meaning "glibness of the tongue", such as malabiga
    Synonyms: daldal, kadaldalan
  2. root of words meaning "fault-finding habit", such as malabiga
    Synonym: pagkamapintasan
Derived terms edit