See also: Brach

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Originally in plural, from Old French brachez, plural of brachet, a diminutive of Occitan brac, from Frankish. Cognate to the German Bracke. More at brachet.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brach (plural brachs or braches)

  1. (archaic) A hound; especially a female hound used for hunting, a bitch hound.
    • ca. 1604-1606, William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1, 4, 109-111.
      FOOL: Truth's a dog that must to kennel; he must be whipped out, when Lady, the brach, may stand by the fire and stink.
    • 1605, William Shakespeare, King Lear, First Folio (1623), III.6:
      Mastiffe, Grey-hound, Mongrill, Grim, / Hound or Spaniell, Brache, or Hym […].
    • 1621, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy, Oxford: Printed by Iohn Lichfield and Iames Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 216894069; The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd corrected and augmented edition, Oxford: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, 1624, OCLC 54573970:
      , NYRB 2001, vol.1 p.331:
      A sow-pig by chance sucked a brach, and when she was grown, “would miraculously hunt all manner of deer, and that as well, or rather better than any ordinary hound.”
  2. (archaic, derogatory) A despicable or disagreeable woman.
SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Shortening of brachiopod.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brach (plural brachs)

  1. (paleontology, informal) brachiopod

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brach m

  1. (colloquial) bro
  2. (colloquial) guy

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /braːx/, [bʁaːχ]
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

Backformation from brachliegen, from in Brache liegen, from the noun Brache (fallow land, fallowness). Cognate with Dutch braak. Related with brechen (etymology 2).

AdjectiveEdit

brach (not comparable)

  1. fallow
    Synonyms: unbestellt, unbebaut
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

brach

  1. First-person singular preterite of brechen.
  2. Third-person singular preterite of brechen.

IrishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

brach m (genitive singular bracha)

  1. pus
  2. discharge from eyes during sleep
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

brach f (genitive singular braiche)

  1. Alternative form of braich (malt)
DeclensionEdit

VerbEdit

brach (present analytic brachann, future analytic brachfaidh, verbal noun brachadh, past participle brachta)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) Alternative form of braich (malt)
ConjugationEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
brach bhrach mbrach
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From brat (brother) +‎ -ch.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brach m pers

  1. (colloquial) a male comrade or friend; bro

DeclensionEdit

NounEdit

brach m

  1. locative plural of ber
    Synonym: berach

Further readingEdit

  • brach in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • brach in Polish dictionaries at PWN