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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈklævɪfɔːɹm/, /ˈkleɪvɪfɔːɹm/

Etymology 1Edit

Latin clāva + -iform.

AdjectiveEdit

claviform (comparative more claviform, superlative most claviform)

  1. Club-shaped.
    • 1986, Christiane Schoepfer-Sterrer, Marine Fauna and Flora of Bermuda: A Systematic Guide to the Identification of Marine Organisms, Wiley-Interscience:
      They vary in shape from filiform (thread-shaped) or claviform (club-shaped) to capitate (with a terminal knob) or moniliform (with a series of knobs).
    • 1998, Jean Clottes, J. David Lewis-Williams, Chamanes de la préhistoire:
      The claviform (club-shaped) shapes are especially prevalent in the Pyrenees particularly in the Ariege (fig. 47), but they are also found in the Dordogne (Lascaux, Gabillou), in Quercy (Saint-Eulalie), and on the Cantabrian coast ...

Etymology 2Edit

Latin clāvus.

AdjectiveEdit

claviform (comparative more claviform, superlative most claviform)

  1. Nail-shaped.
    • 1988, M. Zabala, P. Maluquer, Illustrated Keys for the Classification of Mediterranean Bryozoa, page 62:
      Colony small, erect, coriaceous, claviform (nail-shaped), with two well differentiated parts.

Etymology 3Edit

Latin clāvis.

AdjectiveEdit

claviform (comparative more claviform, superlative most claviform)

  1. Key-shaped.
    • 2009, Bruno Barbatti, Berber Carpets of Morocco: The Symbols Origin and Meaning (→ISBN):
      Leroi-Gourhan identifies the following male signs: hook, single and double bars, dots and rows of dots. The bars derive from the phallus and the dots – we are convinced – stand for drops of sperm. He identifies the following female signs: triangles, rectangles, oval, derived from vulva and pudenda, and claviform, i.e. key-shaped signs, abstractions from a woman's figure with prominent backside (row H).

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [klaːviˈfɔʁm]
  • Hyphenation: cla‧vi‧form

AdjectiveEdit

claviform (not comparable)

  1. claviform

DeclensionEdit