See also: Coll, coll., coll', and Coll.

English

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Etymology

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From Old French coler, acoler (accoll, throw arms round neck of); ultimately from Latin ad + collum (neck).

Pronunciation

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Verb

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coll (third-person singular simple present colls, present participle colling, simple past and past participle colled)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To hug or embrace.
    • 1891, Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urbervilles, volume 1, London: James R. Osgood, McIlvaine and Co., page 82:
      'You couldn't expect her to throw her arms round 'ee, an' to kiss and to coll 'ee all at once.'
    • 1995, Anthony Burgess, Byrne:
      They kissed and colled in parks and fields and, better, a / Warm bed, her own.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Edmund Spenser to this entry?)

Translations

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Catalan

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Latin collum. Compare Occitan còl and French cou.

Noun

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coll m (plural colls)

  1. (anatomy) neck
  2. (anatomy) throat
    Synonym: gola
    mal de collsore throat
  3. (clothing) collar (part of a garment)
  4. neckline
  5. (card games) suit
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Inherited from Latin collis (hill).

Noun

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coll m (plural colls)

  1. (archaic or regional) hill
    Synonyms: puig, turó
  2. col, pass (through hills)
    Synonym: pas
Derived terms
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Further reading

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Irish

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Old Irish coll, from Proto-Celtic *koslos (hazel) (compare Welsh cyll).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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coll m (genitive singular coill)

  1. hazel
  2. the letter C in the Ogham alphabet

Declension

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Derived terms

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Mutation

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Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
coll choll gcoll
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References

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Old Irish

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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coll

From Proto-Celtic *koslos (hazel), from Proto-Indo-European *kóslos (hazel) (compare Welsh cyll).

Noun

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coll m

  1. hazel (tree or shrub of the genus Corylus)
Inflection
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Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative coll collL cuillL
Vocative cuill collL culluH
Accusative collN collL culluH
Genitive cuillL coll collN
Dative cullL collaib collaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization
Descendants
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  • Irish: coll
  • Manx: coull
  • Scottish Gaelic: coll

Etymology 2

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From Proto-Celtic *kolCos (lost), precise form uncertain, C could represent n, s, or d. Ultimately derived from Proto-Indo-European *kelh₂- (to break).[1]

Noun

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coll n

  1. destruction, injury, violation
Inflection
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Neuter o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative collN collN collL, colla
Vocative collN collN collL, colla
Accusative collN collN collL, colla
Genitive cuillL coll collN
Dative cullL collaib collaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization
Derived terms
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Descendants
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Mutation

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Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
coll choll coll
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References

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  1. ^ Zair, Nicholas (2012) The reflexes of the Proto-Indo-European laryngeals in Celtic, Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, pages 245, 249

Further reading

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Scottish Gaelic

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Old Irish coll (hazel), from Proto-Celtic *koslos (hazel) (compare Welsh cyll).

Noun

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coll m (genitive coill)

  1. hazel (tree)
  2. (obsolete) the letter C in the Ogham alphabet

Etymology 2

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From Old Irish coll (destruction), from Proto-Celtic *koldom (destruction).

Noun

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coll m

  1. destruction

Welsh

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Proto-Celtic *koldom (destruction).

Noun

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coll m (uncountable)

  1. loss
    Synonyms: aball, methiant, diffyg, pall

Adjective

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coll (feminine singular coll, plural coll, not comparable)

  1. lost, missing

Etymology 2

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See cyll (hazel).

Noun

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coll f (collective, singulative collen)

  1. (obsolete) hazel
  2. (obsolete) twig

Derived terms

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Mutation

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Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
coll goll ngholl choll
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References

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  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “coll”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Wolof

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Noun

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coll (definite form coll bi)

  1. summit, peak, tip
  2. cormorant

References

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  • Fal, Arame, Santos, Rosine, Doneux, Jean Léonce (1990) Dictionnaire wolof-français, Paris: Éditions KARTHALA, →ISBN, page 53