console

See also: consolé

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

a console (sense 5), decorated with a figure
operator’s console (sense 3) on an IBM 1620 computer (1964)

Borrowed from French console (bracket, noun), from consoler (to console, to comfort, verb).

Sense of “bracket” either due to a bracket alleviating the load, or due to brackets being decorated with the Christian figure of a consolateur (consoler),[1] itself perhaps a pun on the first sense (alleviating load).

Originally used for the bracket itself, then for wall-mounted tables (mounted with a bracket), then for free-standing tables placed against a wall. Use for control system dates at least to 1880s for an “organ console”; use for electrical or electronic control systems dates at least to 1930s in radio, television, and system control, particularly as “mixer console” or “control console”, attached to an equipment rack. This was popularized in computers by mainframes such as the IBM 704 (1954) in terms such as “operator’s console” or “console typewriter”, and then generalized to any attached equipment, particularly for user interaction. The automotive sense harks back to earlier use as “support”.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

console (plural consoles)

  1. A stand-alone cabinet designed to stand on the floor; especially, one integrated with home entertainment equipment, such as a TV or stereo system.
  2. A desk-like cabinet, table, or stand upon which controls, instruments, and displays are mounted.
  3. An instrument with displays and an input device that is used to monitor and control an electronic system.
    • 1961 March, “The new Glasgow Central signalbox”, in Trains Illustrated, page 177:
      The operating console of the new Glasgow Central cabin is divided into four sections, each at an angle to each other and each of which is normally under one signalman's control; [...]
    1. The keyboard and screen of a computer or other electronic device.
    2. (video games) A consumer device dedicated to playing video games, with the ability to change games.
  4. (automotive) A storage tray or container mounted between the seats of an automobile.
  5. (architecture) An ornamental member jutting out of a wall to carry a superincumbent weight, often S-shaped.
    Coordinate term: corbel
    Hyponym: ancon
    Hypernym: bracket
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from French consoler, from Latin cōnsōlor (I console, I offer solace), root from Proto-Indo-European *selh₂- (mercy, comfort) (whence also solace).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

console (third-person singular simple present consoles, present participle consoling, simple past and past participle consoled)

  1. (transitive) To comfort (someone) in a time of grief, disappointment, etc.
    • P. Henry
      I am much consoled by the reflection that the religion of Christ has been attacked in vain by all the wits and philosophers, and its triumph has been complete.
    • 1856: Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary, Part III Chapter X, translated by Eleanor Marx-Aveling
      "Do you remember, my friend, that I went to Tostes once when you had just lost your first deceased? I consoled you at that time. I thought of something to say then, but now—" Then, with a loud groan that shook his whole chest, "Ah! this is the end for me, do you see! I saw my wife go, then my son, and now to-day it's my daughter."
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Console et Train, Mot pour mot, la rubrique de Jean Pruvost, Canal Académie

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French console.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kɔnˈzoːl/, (rare) /ˈkɔn.zoːl/
  • Hyphenation: con‧so‧le
  • Rhymes: -oːl

NounEdit

console m (plural consoles)

  1. (architecture) A projection from a wall supporting a superincumbent weight.
  2. A console (electronic control instrument with displays and an input device).
  3. (gaming) A video game console, a console, especially a non-portable one. [from ca. 1990s]
    Synonym: spelcomputer

Usage notesEdit

  • Usually pronounced with stress on the last syllable in line with the convention for borrowings from French, corresponding to the stress placement on the English verb. Pronunciation using the stress of the English noun is rather rare.
  • (video game console):
    • Mostly used by avid gamers and former gamers. Non-gamers tend to use the synonym spelcomputer instead and may find console pretentious or incorrect. This distinction in term usage seems to date to the mid/late nineties or early aughties.
    • Typically used for non-portable video game consoles, but may occasionally be applied to handhelds.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably a shortened from consolateur, denoting the same architectural element, ultimately from consoler (to console, to comfort).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

console f (plural consoles)

  1. (architecture) a projection or spur on a wall, generally in the form of an "S", supporting a cornice, balcony etc.
    • 1883, Émile Zola, Au Bonheur des Dames:
      ‘Puis, à mesure que la charpente métallique montait, […] les consoles et les corbeaux se chargeaient de sculptures.’
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  2. (carpentry) projecting piece of timber in the form of a cantilever arm
  3. (by analogy) piece of furniture abutted against a wall, serving as adornment and for the presentation of other fitments (such as pieces in bronze, clocks, vases etc.)
  4. (music) upper part of the harp holding the chords, or the controlling interface of a pipe organ
  5. (by ellipsis) video game console, electronic gadget serving in order to play video games
    Synonym: console de jeux
  6. (electronics) physical interface allowing the control of an electronic system
  7. (informatics) programmed interface of a system

DescendantsEdit

VerbEdit

console

  1. inflection of consoler:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin cōnsulem, accusative form of cōnsul.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

console m (plural consoli)

  1. consul
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from French console.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /konˈsɔl/
  • Rhymes: -ɔl
  • Hyphenation: con‧sòle

NounEdit

console f (invariable)

  1. console, specifically:
  2. a stand-alone cabinet designed to stand on the floor; especially, one that houses home entertainment equipment
  3. (video games) a device dedicated to playing video games

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

console f (plural consoles)

  1. (Jersey) Russian comfrey Symphytum × uplandicum

PortugueseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from English console.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

console m (plural consoles)

  1. (Brazil) console (device dedicated to playing video games)
    Synonym: (Portugal) consola
QuotationsEdit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:console.

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

console

  1. inflection of consolar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative
QuotationsEdit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:consolar.