Open main menu

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English deye, deie, daie, from Old English dǣġe (maker of bread; baker; dairy-maid), from Proto-Germanic *daigijǭ (kneader of bread, maid), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeyǵʰ- (to knead, form, build). Cognate with Swedish deja, Icelandic deigja (dairy-maid); compare dairy, dough, lady.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

dey (plural deys)

  1. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) A servant who has charge of the dairy; a dairymaid.

Etymology 2Edit

From French dey, from Turkish dayı.

NounEdit

dey (plural deys)

  1. (historical) The ruler of the Regency of Algiers (now Algeria) under the Ottoman Empire.
    • 1977, Alistair Horne, A Savage War of Peace, New York Review Books 2006, p. 29:
      [] the reigning Dey of Algiers (half of whose twenty-eight predecessors are said to have met violent ends) lost his temper with the French consul, struck him in the face with a fly-whisk, and called him ‘a wicked, faithless, idol-worshipping rascal’.

Etymology 3Edit

PronounEdit

dey

  1. Eye dialect spelling of they, representing African American Vernacular English.
  2. Eye dialect spelling of there, representing African American Vernacular English. (Can we add an example for this sense?)

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dey

  1. inflection of deyja:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English dæġ.

NounEdit

dey

  1. Alternative form of day

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse þeir.

PronounEdit

dey

  1. Alternative form of þei

Etymology 3Edit

From Old French de.

NounEdit

dey

  1. Alternative form of dee

Nigerian PidginEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English there.

VerbEdit

dey

  1. is, are