See also: Dey and deþ

English edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English deye, deie, daie, from Old English dǣġe (maker of bread; baker; dairy-maid), from Proto-West Germanic *daigijā, from Proto-Germanic *daigijǭ (kneader of bread, maid), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeyǵʰ- (to knead, form, build). Cognate with Swedish deja, Icelandic deigja (dairy-maid); compare dairy, dough, lady.

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

dey (plural deys)

  1. (UK dialectal, Scotland) A servant who has charge of the dairy; a dairymaid.
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From French dey, from Ottoman Turkishدایی⁩ (modern Turkish dayı).

Noun edit

dey (plural deys)

  1. (historical) The ruler of the Regency of Algiers (now Algeria) under the Ottoman Empire.
    • 1977, Alistair Horne, A Savage War of Peace, New York: Review Books, published 2006, page 29:
      [] the reigning Dey of Algiers (half of whose twenty-eight predecessors are said to have met violent ends) lost his temper with the French consul, struck him in the face with a fly-whisk, and called him ‘a wicked, faithless, idol-worshipping rascal’.

Etymology 3 edit

Pronoun edit

dey

  1. Pronunciation spelling of they, representing dialects with th-stopping in English.
  2. Pronunciation spelling of there, representing African American Vernacular English or Caribbean English.
    • 2012, G. Modele Dale Clarke, Up in Mahaica: Stories from the Market People (ebook), Xlibris:
      “Boy, is horrors over dey, for so,” he said, obviously excited and anxious to be the bearer of extraordinary news. “Wat happen, somebody dead?”

Etymology 4 edit

From Tamil டேய் (hey!).

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

dey

  1. (Singapore, Malaysia, slang, rare, between friends) A familiar term of address conveying extra emphasis at the end of sentences.
Usage notes edit

Used after lah (Sense 1) in most cases.

References edit

Anagrams edit

Cameroon Pidgin edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From English there.

Predicative edit

dey

  1. there is, there are, indicates presence in a location
Alternative forms edit
See also edit
  • na (copula for noun phrases, indicates existence)

Etymology 2 edit

From English they.

Pronoun edit

dey

  1. they, 3rd person plural subject personal pronoun
See also edit

Etymology 3 edit

From English day.

Noun edit

dey

  1. day
Alternative forms edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Ottoman Turkishدایی(dayı), from Persianدایی(dâyi, maternal uncle).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /dɛj/
  • (file)

Noun edit

dey m (plural deys)

  1. dey (ruler of the Regency of Algiers)

Further reading edit

German edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English they, adjusted to German phonology and suppleted with forms of plural article die.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

dey

  1. (neologism) they (singular). Gender-neutral third-person singular subject pronoun.

Declension edit

  • Nominative: dey
  • Accusative: demm or dey or dem (with a short vowel)
  • Dative: denen or demm or dem (with a short vowel)
  • Genitive: deren
  • Possessive: deren

Icelandic edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

dey

  1. inflection of deyja:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Italian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Ottoman Turkishدایی(dayı), from Persianدایی(dâyi, maternal uncle).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

dey m (invariable)

  1. dey (ruler of the Regency of Algiers)

References edit

  1. ^ dey in Dizionario Italiano Olivetti, Olivetti Media Communication
  2. ^ dey in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

dey

  1. Alternative form of day

Etymology 2 edit

Pronoun edit

dey

  1. Alternative form of þei (they)

Etymology 3 edit

Noun edit

dey

  1. Alternative form of dee

Nigerian Pidgin edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From English there.

Verb edit

dey

  1. to be
    • (Can we date this quote?), Zanele Buthelezi, Thembani Dladla, Clare Verbeek, “Count animals”, in Storybooks African Languages[1]:
      One elephant dey go drink water.
      One elephant is going to drink water.

Old Norse edit

Verb edit

dey

  1. inflection of deyja:
    1. first-person singular present active indicative
    2. second-person singular present active imperative

Yola edit

Noun edit

dey

  1. Alternative form of die (day)
    • 1867, “A YOLA ZONG”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 2, page 84:
      Ch'am a stouk, an a donel; wou'll leigh out ee dey.
      I am a fool and a dunce; we'll idle out the day.
    • DR. RUSSELL ON THE INHABITANTS AND DIALECT OF THE BARONY OF FORTH, page 131:
      Fad didn'st thou cum t' ouz on zum other dey?

References edit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith

Zaghawa edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

dey

  1. foot, leg
  2. footstep

References edit