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See also: Dome, domé, dôme, døme, and domē

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French dôme, from Italian duomo, from Latin domus (ecclesiae) (literally house (of the church)), a calque of Ancient Greek οἶκος τῆς ἐκκλησίας (oîkos tês ekklēsías).

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: dōm, IPA(key): /dəʊm/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -əʊm

NounEdit

dome (plural domes)

  1. (architecture) a structural element resembling the hollow upper half of a sphere; a cupola
  2. anything shaped like an upset bowl, often used as a cover
    a cake dome
  3. (slang) head (uppermost part of one's body)
    • 1962, Myles Rudge (lyrics and music), “Right Said Fred”:
      Was he in trouble, half a ton of rubble landed on the top of his dome.
    • 2016, Monkey (lyrics), “Let’s Lurk”, performed by 67 ft Giggs:
      Trapping ain't dead, the nitty still clucking and ringing my phone
      Chilling with bro, talking ’bout money, dough to the dome
  4. (slang) head, oral sex
    • 2005, “Georgia”, performed by Ludacris:
      I got five Georgia homes where I rest my Georgia bones,
      Come anywhere on my land and I'll aim at your Georgia dome.
    • 2005, “Georgia Dome”, performed by Ying Yang Twins:
      Put your mouth on a dick, give me Georgia Dome.
  5. (obsolete, poetic) a building; a house; an edifice
    • 1726, Alexander Pope, Odyssey:
      Approach the dome, the social banquet share.
  6. any erection resembling the dome or cupola of a building, such as the upper part of a furnace, the vertical steam chamber on the top of a boiler, etc.
  7. (crystallography) a prism formed by planes parallel to a lateral axis which meet above in a horizontal edge, like the roof of a house; also, one of the planes of such a form

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

dome (third-person singular simple present domes, present participle doming, simple past and past participle domed)

  1. (transitive) To give a domed shape to.
    • 1814, Leigh Hunt, “Ode for the Spring of 1814”, in The Descent of Liberty, a Mask, London: Printed for Gale, Curtis, and Fenner, [], published 1815, OCLC 709322, page lix:
      The green and laughing world he sees, / Waters, and plains, and waving trees, / The skim of birds, and the blue-doming skies, []
    • 1907, Joseph Barrell, Geology of the Marysville Mining District, Montana, page 24:
      [] the general effect being to dome the cover upward at least 1,000 and probably 2,000 feet, and to metamorphose the limy sediments into hornstones []
  2. (transitive, US, African American Vernacular, colloquial, slang) To perform fellatio on.

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

NounEdit

dome

  1. vocative singular of dům

LatvianEdit

EtymologyEdit

A late 19th-century borrowing from Russian ду́ма (dúma, administrative institution).[1]

PronunciationEdit

(file)

NounEdit

dome f (5th declension)

  1. (often plural) council (legislative or administrative organ)
    pilsētas dome, domescity council
    domes vēlēšanascity council elections
    Valsts Dome(s)State Duma (Russian Legislative Body)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Karulis, Konstantīns (1992), “doma”, in Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (in Latvian), Rīga: AVOTS, →ISBN

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English dōm, from Proto-Germanic *dōmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰóh₁mos.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dome

  1. a judgement, (legal) decision or sentence
  2. a decision or order
  3. a court or trial issuing judgement
  4. final judgement after death
  5. justice, rulership, authority

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

dome

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of domar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of domar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of domar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of domar

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdome/, [ˈd̪ome]

VerbEdit

dome

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of domar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of domar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of domar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of domar.

VolapükEdit

NounEdit

dome

  1. dative singular of dom