See also: Dose, dosé, and dōse

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French dose, from Medieval Latin dosis, from Ancient Greek δόσις (dosis, a portion prescribed, literally a giving), used by Galen and other Greek physicians to mean an amount of medicine, from δίδωμι (didōmi, to give).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dose (plural doses)

  1. A measured portion of medicine taken at any one time.
  2. The quantity of an agent (not always active) substance or radiation administered at any one time.
  3. A venereal infection.
    • 1978, Lawrence Durrell, Livia, Faber & Faber 1992 (Avignon Quintet), p. 382:
      It would be very expensive to cure a dose here, as well as unbelievably painful.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

dose (third-person singular simple present doses, present participle dosing, simple past and past participle dosed)

  1. to administer a dose
  2. to prescribe a dose

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

NounEdit

dose

  1. plural form of doos

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

dose f (plural doses)

  1. proportion
  2. dose

VerbEdit

dose

  1. first-person singular present indicative of doser
  2. third-person singular present indicative of doser
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of doser
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of doser
  5. second-person singular imperative of doser

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

dose f (plural dosi)

  1. dose
  2. quantity, amount, measure
  3. deal (great-good) (gran dose-buona dose)

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

dose f (plural doses)

  1. dose (measured portion of medicine)
  2. (informal) fix (a single dose of an addictive drug)
Last modified on 27 March 2014, at 18:49