See also: fàscia

EnglishEdit

 
Pope Benedict XVI wearing a white fascia, while a cardinal is seated near him (partially obscured from view) wearing a red fascia (sense 7).

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin fascia (a band, bandage, swathe). Related to fascēs (bundle of rods containing an axe with the blade projecting), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰask- (bundle, band). Doublet of fajita, fess, and fascism.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfæʃə/, /ˈfæʃjə/, /ˈfæʃi.ə/
  • IPA(key): /ˈfeɪʃə/, /ˈfeɪʃjə/, /ˈfeɪʃi.ə/ (especially sense 1)
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æʃə

NounEdit

fascia (plural fascias or fasciae)

  1. (architecture) A wide band of material covering the ends of roof rafters, sometimes supporting a gutter in steep-slope roofing, but typically it is a border or trim in low-slope roofing.
    Synonym: frieze
  2. A face or front cover of an appliance, especially of a mobile phone.
    Synonym: case
  3. (UK) A dashboard.
    Synonym: dashboard
  4. (architecture) A flat band or broad fillet; especially, one of the three bands that make up the architrave, in the Ionic order.
  5. A broad well-defined band of color.
  6. A band, sash, or fillet; especially, in surgery, a bandage or roller.
  7. (ecclesiastical, fashion) A sash worn by certain members of the Catholic and Anglican churches.
    Synonym: sash
  8. (anatomy) The layer of loose tissue, often containing fat, immediately beneath the skin; the stronger layer of connective tissue covering and investing all muscles; an aponeurosis.
  9. The signboard above a shop or other location open to the public.

Usage notesEdit

The plural fascias is used for the first five definitions while fasciae is used for the sixth.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fascia. Compare Spanish faja, Portuguese faixa, Romanian fașă.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fascia f (plural fasce)

  1. strip, band
  2. bandage
  3. sash
  4. (geography) belt
  5. (heraldry) fess

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

See fascis.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fascia f (genitive fasciae); first declension

  1. band, bandage, swathe, strip, ribbon
  2. (New Latin) necktie
    • 2003, J. K. Rowling (Translation by Peter Needham), Harrius Potter et Philosophi Lapis, Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, London, page 2:
      Dominus Dursley bombiebat dum fasciam hebetissimi coloris eligebat idoneam ad negotia gerenda

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative fascia fasciae
Genitive fasciae fasciārum
Dative fasciae fasciīs
Accusative fasciam fasciās
Ablative fasciā fasciīs
Vocative fascia fasciae

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • fascia”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • fascia”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • fascia in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • fascia in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • fascia”, in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • fascia”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • fascia”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin fascia. Doublet of faja and haza.

NounEdit

fascia f (plural fascias)

  1. (anatomy) fascia (a layer of loose tissue)

Further readingEdit