See also: Jot and jót

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin iōta, from Ancient Greek ἰῶτα (iôta). Doublet of iota.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jot (plural jots)

  1. Iota; the smallest letter or stroke of any writing.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, [] (King James Version), London: [] Robert Barker, [], OCLC 964384981, Matthew 5:18, column 1:
      For verily I ſay vnto you, Till heauen and earth paſſe, one iote or one tittle, ſhall in no wiſe paſſe from the law, till all be fulfilled.
    • 1904, Bliss Carman, “Christmas Eve at St. Kavin’s” in Pipes of Pan: Songs from a Northern Garden, Boston: L.C. Page, p. 107,[1]
      Of old, men said, “Sin not;
      By every line and jot
      Ye shall abide; man’s heart is false and vile.”
  2. A small amount, bit; the smallest amount.
    He didn't care a jot for his work.
  3. (obsolete) A moment, an instant.
  4. A brief and hurriedly written note.
    • 1662, Henry More, An Antidote Against Atheism, Book II, A Collection of Several Philosophical Writings of Dr. Henry More, p. 53:
      "I say, it is no uneven jot, to pass from the more faint and obscure examples of Spermatical life to the more considerable effects of general Motion in Minerals, Metalls, and sundry Meteors ..."
    • 1920, Robert Nichols, “Sonnets to Aurelia, IV” in Aurelia and Other Poems, London: Chatto & Windus, p. 29,[6]
      “Lover,” you say; “how beautiful that is,
      That little word!” []
      Yes, it is beautiful. I have marked it long,
      Long in my dusty head its jot secreted,
      Yet my heart never knew this word a song
      Till in the night softly by you repeated.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

jot (third-person singular simple present jots, present participle jotting, simple past and past participle jotted)

  1. (usually with "down") To write quickly.
    Tell me your order, so I can jot it down.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.


AnagramsEdit


Central FranconianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German guod, northern variant of guot, from Proto-Germanic *gōdaz.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

jot (masculine jode, feminine jot, comparative besser, superlative et beste)

  1. (most of Ripuarian) good

IngrianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic *jo-. Cognate to Finnish jotta.

ConjunctionEdit

jot

  1. so that, in order that

LuxembourgishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

jot

  1. inflection of joen:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

Rayón ZoqueEdit

NounEdit

jot

  1. bird

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Harrison, Roy; B. de Harrison, Margaret; López Juárez, Francisco; Ordoñes, Cosme (1984) Vocabulario zoque de Rayón (Serie de diccionarios y vocabularios indígenas Mariano Silva y Aceves; 28)‎[7] (in Spanish), México, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, page 10