CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 n

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter H.

Further readingEdit

  • in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

DakotaEdit

NounEdit

  1. skin, hide

FaroeseEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 n (genitive singular hás, plural )

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter H.

DeclensionEdit

Declension of
n3 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative háið háini
accusative háið háini
dative hái háinum háum háunum
genitive hás hásins háa háanna

See alsoEdit

InterjectionEdit

há!

  1. ha!

Derived termsEdit


HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈhaː]
  • (file)

NounEdit

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter H.

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative hák
accusative hát hákat
dative hának háknak
instrumental hával hákkal
causal-final háért hákért
translative hává hákká
terminative háig hákig
essive-formal háként hákként
essive-modal
inessive hában hákban
superessive hán hákon
adessive hánál háknál
illative hába hákba
sublative hára hákra
allative hához hákhoz
elative hából hákból
delative háról hákról
ablative hától háktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
háé háké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
háéi hákéi
Possessive forms of
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. hám háim
2nd person sing. hád háid
3rd person sing. hája hái
1st person plural hánk háink
2nd person plural hátok háitok
3rd person plural hájuk háik

See alsoEdit


IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

 n (genitive singular hás, nominative plural )

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter H.
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

 f (genitive singular hár or háar, nominative plural hár)

  1. aftergrass, aftermath
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

(weak verb, third-person singular past indicative háði, supine háð)

  1. (transitive, with dative) to injure, to handicap

MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

(Zhuyin ㄏㄚˊ)

  1. Pinyin transcription of
  2. Pinyin transcription of
  3. Pinyin transcription of

NavajoEdit

PostpositionEdit

  1. for him/her/it/one/them, for his/her/its/one's/their sake
  2. in his/her/its/one's/their favor

InflectionEdit


Old NorseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

InterjectionEdit

  1. eh! what do you say?

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *hah(w)ō, cognate with Faroese hógvur and Norwegian Nynorsk .

NounEdit

 f

  1. aftergrass
DeclensionEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Norwegian Nynorsk:  m or f
  • Norwegian Bokmål:  m or f

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

  1. Alternative form of hafa

Etymology 4Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

AdjectiveEdit

  1. inflection of hár:
    1. positive degree strong feminine nominative singular
    2. positive degree strong neuter nominative/accusative plural

NounEdit

  1. inflection of hár:
    1. indefinite accusative/dative singular
    2. indefinite genitive plural
  2. inflection of hár:
    1. indefinite accusative/dative singular
    2. indefinite accusative/genitive plural

ReferencesEdit

  • in A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, G. T. Zoëga, Clarendon Press, 1910, at Internet Archive.

PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • ha (obsolete)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

  1. (impersonal verb) there is; there are.
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of haver
  3. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of haver

QuotationsEdit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:haver.


RohingyaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Sanskrit [Term?].

VerbEdit

  1. to eat

ShaboEdit

VerbEdit

  1. to kill

VietnameseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Vietic *haːʔ, from Proto-Mon-Khmer *haʔ; cognates include Proto-Bahnaric *haː (to open mouth) (whence Bahnar ha) and Khmer ហា (haa). Compare also hả, also has the same meaning, from Proto-Mon-Khmer *hah.

VerbEdit

(𠹛)

  1. to open (mouth)

Etymology 2Edit

ParticleEdit

  1. (literary) isn't it
    Ấy phải là ác hay sao?
    Is it not evil-doing?