indolent

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French indolent, from Latin indolens, from in- (not) +‎ dolēns (hurting), from doleo (to hurt).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈɪn.də.lənt/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

indolent (comparative more indolent, superlative most indolent)

  1. Habitually lazy, procrastinating, or resistant to physical labor
    The indolent girl resisted doing her homework.
    • 1815, Jane Austen, Emma, volume II, chapter 18:
      Mr. Churchill has pride; but his pride is nothing to his wife’s: his is a quiet, indolent, gentlemanlike sort of pride that would harm nobody, and only make himself a little helpless and tiresome; but her pride is arrogance and insolence!
  2. Inducing laziness
    indolent comfort
  3. (medicine) Causing little or no physical pain; progressing slowly; inactive (of an ulcer, etc.)
  4. (medicine) Healing slowly

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin indolentem, accusative singular masculine and feminine of indolēns, from in- (not) + dolēns (pain).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

indolent (feminine singular indolente, masculine plural indolents, feminine plural indolentes)

  1. indolent (all senses)

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French indolent.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɪndoˈlɛnt/, /ˈɪndolɛnt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: in‧do‧lent

AdjectiveEdit

indolent (comparative indolenter, superlative am indolentesten)

  1. indolent (mentally lazy)
    Synonym: denkfaul
  2. (medicine) insensible to pain

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • indolent” in Duden online
  • indolent” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French indolent, from Latin indolens.

AdjectiveEdit

indolent m or n (feminine singular indolentă, masculine plural indolenți, feminine and neuter plural indolente)

  1. indolent

DeclensionEdit