See also: Lier

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English lier, equivalent to lie +‎ -er. Compare ligger, lidger, ledger.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lier (plural liers)

  1. A person or thing that lies, in the sense of being horizontal.
  2. A lie-abed; one who stays in bed late.
  3. Obsolete spelling of liar
  4. Misspelling of liar.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch liere, from Latin lyra, from Ancient Greek λύρα (lúra).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /lir/, [liːr], [liə̯r]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: lier
  • Rhymes: -ir

NounEdit

lier f (plural lieren, diminutive liertje n)

  1. (music) lyre
  2. (music) hurdy-gurdy, wheel fiddle
  3. winch

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French lier, from Latin ligāre, present active infinitive of ligō, from Proto-Indo-European *leyǵ- (to bind).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lier

  1. to link
  2. to associate
  3. (cooking) to thicken
    lier une sauceto thicken a sauce

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • German: liieren

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

līer

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of līō

Norwegian NynorskEdit

NounEdit

lier f

  1. indefinite plural of li

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • liier, lïer (diaereses not universally used by scholars of Old French)

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ligāre, present active infinitive of ligō.

VerbEdit

lier

  1. to tie up; to connect with a tie

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

DescendantsEdit