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See also: lût, lüt, lụt, and łūt

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AlbanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *lutśi-, from Proto-Indo-European *leuT-. Cognate to Latin laudo (to praise), Gothic 𐌻𐌹𐌿𐌸𐍉𐌽 (liuþōn, to sing). Alternatively from Proto-Indo-European *leud 'to bend, bent, small'. Compare Lithuanian liūstù (be sad), Old English lutian (hide, conceal lie, lurk), lȳt (small), Gothic 𐌻𐌿𐍄𐍉𐌽 (lutōn, cheat, deceive), Old Norse ljotr (ugly).

NounEdit

lut

  1. to beg, pray, request

AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lutum. Compare Daco-Romanian lut.

NounEdit

lut

  1. clay, loam

Related termsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle Low German lute (lute).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lut c (singular definite lutten, plural indefinite lutter)

  1. lute

InflectionEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

VerbEdit

lut

  1. third-person singular past historic of lire

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin lutum (mud).

NounEdit

lut m (plural luts)

  1. lute; slip

Further readingEdit


LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

lut

  1. rafsi of pluta (route/path).

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

Related to the verb lauge

NounEdit

lut f, m (definite singular luta or luten, uncountable)

  1. lye (alkaline solution)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse hlutr.

NounEdit

lut m (definite singular luten, indefinite plural lutar or luter, definite plural lutane or lutene)

  1. a part
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Related to the verb lauga.

NounEdit

lut m (definite singular luten, uncountable)
or
lut f (definite singular luta, uncountable)

  1. lye (alkaline liquid)
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *hlūdaz, whence also Old English hlūd.

AdjectiveEdit

lūt

  1. loud

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lut m inan

  1. solder joint
  2. solder

DeclensionEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lutum (mud).

NounEdit

lut n (plural luturi)

  1. clay, loam

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


SwedishEdit

 
Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

NounEdit

lut (uncountable)

  1. lye (a strong caustic alkaline solution of potassium or sodium salts)
    Från filtret går luten tillbaks till kokaren
    From the filter, the lye returns to the boiler
  2. inclination, the degree of sloping

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


VolapükEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German Luft (air). (The 'f' removed because it wouldn't quite conform to Volapük phonotactics, and would make the word appear too a posteriori.)

NounEdit

lut (uncountable luts)

  1. air

DeclensionEdit