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EnglishEdit

NounEdit

lus

  1. plural of lu

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs, from Proto-Indo-European *lawH-.

NounEdit

lus c (singular definite lusen, plural indefinite lus)

  1. louse

InflectionEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /lʏs/
  • (file)

NounEdit

lus f (plural lussen, diminutive lusje n)

  1. loop

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lus

  1. first-person singular past historic of lire
  2. second-person singular past historic of lire

ParticipleEdit

lus

  1. masculine past participle of lire

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish lus (plant, herb, vegetable).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lus m (genitive singular lusa, nominative plural lusanna)

  1. plant, herb
    Synonym: luibh

DeclensionEdit

  • Alternative genitive singular/nominative plural form: losa

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • Entries containing “lus” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “lus” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

ReferencesEdit


KabuverdianuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese luz

NounEdit

lus

  1. light, lamp

ManxEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish lus (plant, herb, vegetable).

NounEdit

lus m (genitive singular lus, plural lussyn)

  1. plant, herb
  2. leek
  3. vervain

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *luHs-, *lewH-.

NounEdit

lus m or f (definite singular lusa or lusen, indefinite plural lus, definite plural lusene)

  1. a louse (plural lice)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *luHs-, *lewH-.

NounEdit

lus f (definite singular lusa, indefinite plural lus or lyser, definite plural lusene or lysene)

  1. a louse (plural lice)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


NovialEdit

PronounEdit

lus

  1. they (all sexless objects); them (all sexless objects)

Related termsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *lūs. Compare Old High German lūs, Old Norse lús.

NounEdit

lūs f (nominative plural lȳs)

  1. louse

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: lous, lows, lowse

Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

lus m (oblique plural lus, nominative singular lus, nominative plural lus)

  1. pike (fish)

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *lussus (medicinal herb, vegetable), likely influenced by Proto-Celtic *lubā (herb, plant), from Proto-Indo-European *(h₃)lewbʰ- (leaf).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lus m

  1. plant, herb, vegetable
  2. leek

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
lus
also llus after a proclitic
lus
pronounced with /l(ʲ)-/
lus
also llus after a proclitic
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


Old SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs.

NounEdit

lūs f

  1. louse

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


PapiamentuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese luz and Spanish luz and Kabuverdianu lus.

NounEdit

lus

  1. light, lamp

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish lus (plant, herb, vegetable).

NounEdit

lus m (genitive singular luis or lusa, plural lusan)

  1. plant, herb
  2. weed

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish lūs, from Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *luHs-, *lewH-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lus c

  1. louse

DeclensionEdit

Declension of lus 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative lus lusen löss lössen
Genitive lus lusens löss lössens

WestrobothnianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs, from Proto-Indo-European *lawH-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lus f (definite singular lusa, plural lyss, definite plural lystren)

  1. louse

Derived termsEdit