See also: lús and Łuś

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

VerbEdit

lus

  1. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of lu

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

lus

  1. plural of lu

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • lut (Standard Albanian)

EtymologyEdit

Variant of lut.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /lus/, [lʊs] (Standard)
  • IPA(key): /ʎut/, /ʎʊs/ (Gheg)

VerbEdit

lus (first-person singular past tense luta, participle lutur)

  1. (active, transitive) I request, (kindly) ask for; I plead, I beg

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • [1] active verb lut, lus (aorist luta; participle lutur) • Fjalor Shqip

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs, from Proto-Indo-European *lewH-.

NounEdit

lus c (singular definite lusen, plural indefinite lus)

  1. louse

InflectionEdit


DutchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch litse, from Old French lice, from Vulgar Latin līcia, from Latin līcium.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /lʏs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: lus
  • Rhymes: -ʏs

NounEdit

lus f (plural lussen, diminutive lusje n)

  1. loop

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lus

  1. first/second-person singular past historic of lire

ParticipleEdit

lus

  1. masculine past participle of lire

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish lus (plant, herb, vegetable).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lus m (genitive singular lusa, nominative plural lusanna)

  1. plant, herb
    Synonym: luibh

DeclensionEdit

  • Alternative genitive singular/nominative plural form: losa

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • Entries containing “lus” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “lus” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

ReferencesEdit


KabuverdianuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese luz

NounEdit

lus

  1. light, lamp

LombardEdit

EtymologyEdit

Akin to luce, from Latin lux.

NounEdit

lus f

  1. light

ManxEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish lus (plant, herb, vegetable).

NounEdit

lus m (genitive singular lus, plural lussyn)

  1. plant, herb
  2. leek
  3. vervain

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nb

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *luHs-, *lewH-.

NounEdit

lus m or f (definite singular lusa or lusen, indefinite plural lus, definite plural lusene)

  1. a louse (plural lice)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn
 
lus på kufte
stitches in a knitted pattern
 
lus i nype
hairy seeds in a rosehip

Alternative formsEdit

  • Lus (obsolete capitalization)[1]

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *luHs-, *lewH-.

Germanic cognates include Icelandic and Faroese lús, Danish and Swedish lus, German Laus, Dutch luis, and English louse. Wider Indo-European cognates may include some in Brythonic languages, such as Welsh llau and Breton laou.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lus f (definite singular lusa, indefinite plural lus or lyser, definite plural lusene or lysene)

  1. (entomology) a louse (a small blood-sucking insect in the order Siphunculata)
  2. (entomology) a small insect that is either closely related or similar in behaviour or appearance to a true louse
  3. a miser; a stingy and miserly person
  4. (knitting) a single stitch of a different colour compared to the surrounding fabric, often to form a knitted pattern
  5. (botany, colloquial) a hairy seed from a rosehip
  6. (carpentry, woodworking) a piece of wood made to fill a gap that is left open, typically as a mistake during the moulding
  7. (computing) a computer bug
  8. (nautical, cartography) a symbol (a cross with four dots) signifying a rock awash
  9. (colloquial, rare) a crayon

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

  • mus f (mouse) (for its morphological similarities)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Cf. Ivar Aasen (1850) , “Lus”, in Ordbog over det norske Folkesprog, Oslo: Samlaget, published 2000

AnagramsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *lūs. Compare Old High German lūs, Old Norse lús.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lūs f (nominative plural lȳs)

  1. louse

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: lous, lows, lowse

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lucius (pike)

NounEdit

lus m (oblique plural lus, nominative singular lus, nominative plural lus)

  1. pike (fish)

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *lussus (medicinal herb, vegetable), likely influenced by Proto-Celtic *lubā (herb, plant), from Proto-Indo-European *lewbʰ- (leaf).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lus m

  1. plant, herb, vegetable
  2. leek

InflectionEdit

Masculine u-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative lus lusL losae
Vocative lus lusL lusu
Accusative lusN lusL lusu
Genitive losoH, losaH loso, losa losaeN
Dative lusL losaib losaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

DescendantsEdit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
lus
also llus after a proclitic
lus
pronounced with /l(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


Old SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs.

NounEdit

lūs f

  1. louse

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


PapiamentuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese luz and Spanish luz and Kabuverdianu lus.

NounEdit

lus

  1. light, lamp

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish lus (plant, herb, vegetable).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lus m (genitive singular luis or lusa, plural lusan)

  1. plant, herb
  2. weed

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • lus” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “1 lus”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish lūs, from Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *luHs-, *lewH-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lus c

  1. louse

DeclensionEdit

Declension of lus 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative lus lusen löss lössen
Genitive lus lusens löss lössens

WestrobothnianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse lús, from Proto-Germanic *lūs, from Proto-Indo-European *lewH-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lus f (definite singular lusa, plural lyss, definite plural lystren)

  1. louse

Derived termsEdit