See also: Maul

EnglishEdit

 
A maul.

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English malle (mace, maul), from Anglo-Norman mail, from Old French mail, from Latin malleus (hammer). Doublet of malleus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

maul (plural mauls)

  1. A heavy long-handled hammer, used for splitting logs by driving a wedge into them, or in combat.
  2. (rugby) A situation where the player carrying the ball, who must be on his feet, is held by one or more opponents, and one or more of the ball carrier's team mates bind onto the ball carrier.

SynonymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

maul (third-person singular simple present mauls, present participle mauling, simple past and past participle mauled)

  1. To handle someone or something in a rough way.
  2. To savage; to cause serious physical wounds (usually used of an animal).
    The bear mauled him in a terrible way.
  3. (figuratively) To criticise harshly.
  4. (transitive) To beat with the heavy hammer called a maul.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • maul at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • maul in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

AnagramsEdit


CimbrianEdit

NounEdit

maul n

  1. mouth

ReferencesEdit

  • “maul” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

EstonianEdit

NounEdit

maul

  1. adessive singular of magu

Norwegian NynorskEdit

VerbEdit

maul

  1. imperative of maule