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EnglishEdit

 
A mall (shopping center).

EtymologyEdit

Probably a specialised use of maul. Compare pall mall.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mall (plural malls)

  1. place used to play game of pall-mall, and related senses.
    1. (obsolete) the alley where the game of pall mall was played [17th-19th c.]
    2. a public walk; a level shaded walk, a promenade [from 18th c.]
      • Southey
        Part of the area was laid out in gravel walks, and planted with elms; and these convenient and frequented walks obtained the name of the City Mall.
    3. (chiefly Canada, US, Australia, New Zealand) a pedestrianised street, especially a shopping precinct [from 20th c.]
      • 1950 August 15, Philip Hampson, “Field's Plans 15 to 20 Million Shopping Center for Skokie”, in Chicago Daily Tribune[1], page 1:
        The preliminary plans provide for one million square feet of selling space in three main buildings and a double row of shops along a central shopping mall.
      • 2002, Alexander Garvin, The American City: What Works, What Doesn′t, page 179,
        America′s first pedestrianized shopping mall opened in 1959 in Kalamazoo, Michigan. Like most later pedestrian malls, it was intended to revive what everybody thought was a decaying downtown.
    4. an enclosed shopping centre [from 20th c.]
      • 2004, Ralph E. Warner, Get a Life: You Don′t Need a Million to Retire Well, unnumbered page,
        Every day, at about the time the rest of us go to work, groups of retirees gather at many of America′s enclosed shopping malls.
  2. hammer used to play game of pall-mall, and related senses
    1. the heavy wooden mallet used in the game of pall-mall [from 17th c.]
      • 1824, James Hogg, The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner:
        I also fell slightly; but his fall proving a severe one, he arose in wrath, and struck me with the mall which he held in his hand, until my blood flowed copiously […].
    2. (obsolete) the game of polo [17th c.]
    3. (obsolete) an old game played with malls or mallets and balls; pall mall [17th-19th c.]
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Cotton to this entry?)

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

mall (third-person singular simple present malls, present participle malling, simple past and past participle malled)

  1. to beat with a mall, or mallet; to beat with something heavy; to bruise
  2. to build up with the development of shopping malls
  3. (informal) to shop at the mall

AlbanianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Turkish mal.

NounEdit

mall m

  1. goods
    Synonym: çeshit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Indo-European *melh₂- (black), compare zi (black, mourning, sadness) and mallëngjej (to touch emotionally, to move). Alternatively from Proto-Albanian *malwa, close to Sanskrit मल्व (malvá, foolish, thoughtless, unwise), Middle Low German mall (stupid, foolish), West Frisian māl (foolish, mad).

NounEdit

mall m (indefinite plural malle, definite singular malli, definite plural mallet)

  1. longing, missing, nostalgia

BretonEdit

NounEdit

mall m

  1. haste

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin malleus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mall m (plural malls)

  1. hammer

Further readingEdit


CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English mall.

NounEdit

mall

  1. a shopping mall
  2. (by extension) a department store

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish mall, from Proto-Celtic *malnos, from Proto-Indo-European *mel-; compare Ancient Greek μέλλω (méllō, be late).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mall (genitive singular masculine mall, genitive singular feminine moille, plural malla, comparative moille)

  1. slow
    Ní fhanann trá le fear mall.An ebb does not wait for a slow man.

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
mall mhall not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Scottish GaelicEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mall

  1. slow
  2. tardy, late
  3. lazy
  4. weak
  5. calm, placid
    feasgar mall 's na h-eòin a' seinna calm evening and the birds warbling
  6. dull, senseless

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
mall mhall
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • Faclair Gàidhlig Dwelly Air Loidhne, Dwelly, Edward (1911), Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic-English Dictionary (10th ed.), Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • A Pronouncing and Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language (John Grant, Edinburgh, 1925, Compiled by Malcolm MacLennan)

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mall m (plural malls)

  1. mall (shopping centre)

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mall c

  1. a template
    Synonym: schablon

DeclensionEdit

Declension of mall 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative mall mallen mallar mallarna
Genitive malls mallens mallars mallarnas

WestrobothnianEdit

NounEdit

mall m

  1. Alternative spelling of maall