English edit

 
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Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Malay nasi.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nasi (uncountable)

  1. (cooking) Cooked rice.
Hyponyms edit

Etymology 2 edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Borrowed from Arabicنَسِيء(nasīʔ, literally postponement).

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nasi (uncountable)

  1. (Islam) The intercalation of a month in the calendar of pre-Islamic Arabia, often considered heretical.

Etymology 3 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nasi

  1. plural of nasus
Derived terms edit

Anagrams edit

Brunei Malay edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Malayic *nasi, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *nasi. Cognate of Old Malay nasi.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /nasi/
  • Hyphenation: na‧si

Noun edit

nasi

  1. cooked rice

Derived terms edit

See also edit

  • baras (uncooked rice)
  • padi (unmilled rice)

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

From Indonesian nasi.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nasi m (uncountable)

  1. Indonesian-style processed rice (mainly about fried rice in general)
    1. nasi goreng: Indonesian fried rice (originally from Javanese cuisine)

Derived terms edit

Indonesian edit

Etymology edit

From Malay nasi, from Proto-Malayic *nasi, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *nasi.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈnasi/
  • Hyphenation: na‧si

Noun edit

nasi (first-person possessive nasiku, second-person possessive nasimu, third-person possessive nasinya)

  1. nasi, cooked rice
  2. (figuratively) livelihood, luck, fortune

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Dutch: nasi

See also edit

  • beras (uncooked rice)
  • padi (unmilled rice)
  • sawah (paddy field)

Further reading edit

Italian edit

Noun edit

nasi m

  1. plural of naso

Anagrams edit

Kapampangan edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *nasi. Compare Malay nasi, and Old Javanese nasi.

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: na‧si
  • IPA(key): /ˈnasiʔ/, [ˈnäː.siʔ]

Noun edit

násî

  1. cooked rice

See also edit

Latin edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nāsī

  1. inflection of nāsus:
    1. genitive singular
    2. nominative/vocative plural

Malay edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Malayic *nasi, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *nasi. Cognate of Javanese ꦤꦱꦶ (nasi), Old Javanese nasi (cooked rice).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nasi (Jawi spellingناسي⁩, informal 1st possessive nasiku, 2nd possessive nasimu, 3rd possessive nasinya)

  1. cooked rice

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

See also edit

  • sawah (paddy field)
  • beras (uncooked rice)
  • padi (unmilled rice)

References edit

  • Pijnappel, Jan (1875), “ناسي nasi”, in Maleisch-Hollandsch woordenboek, John Enschede en Zonen, Frederik Muller, pages 138
  • Wilkinson, Richard James (1901), “ناسي nasi”, in A Malay-English dictionary, Hong Kong: Kelly & Walsh limited, page 669
  • Wilkinson, Richard James (1932), “nasi”, in A Malay-English dictionary (romanised), volume II, Mytilene, Greece: Salavopoulos & Kinderlis, page 165

Further reading edit

Old Javanese edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *nasi.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /nasi/
  • Hyphenation: na‧si

Noun edit

nasi

  1. cooked rice[1]

See also edit

  • bras (husked rice (unboiled))
  • pari (unmilled rice)
  • sawah (irrigated rice field)

References edit

  1. ^ cf. "nasi" in Zoetmulder, P.J. (1982). Old Javanese-English Dictionary

Polish edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

nasi

  1. virile nominative/vocative plural of nasz

Sakizaya edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Japanese (なし) (nashi, pear).

Noun edit

nasi

  1. pear (fruit)

Swahili edit

Pronunciation edit

Prepositional phrase edit

nasi

  1. Contraction of na sisi: and us, or with us

See also edit

Ternate edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nasi

  1. Alternative form of nanasi (pineapple)

References edit

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh