See also: Nb, NB, nB, n.b., N.B., NB., and N.-B.

Translingual

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Symbol

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nb

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-1 language code for Norwegian Bokmål.

English

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Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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nb

  1. (text messaging) Abbreviation of nobody.
    • 2023 May 10, @mkarrdashh, Twitter[1], archived from the original on 3 November 2023:
      i hate when i text in the gc and nb replys[sic]
    • 2023 June 29, @imkaay, Twitter[2], archived from the original on 3 November 2023:
      everybody say they hiring but nb hiringggg fr 🙄
    • 2023 August 31, u/Regular_Fisherman_51, “first day of high school coming up i need some advice quick”, in Reddit[3], r/BruceDropEmOff, archived from the original on 3 November 2023:
      Do yo own thing and don't gaf about what nb else say
    • 2023 October 5, u/Colors100, “Just need someone to talk to”, in Reddit[4], r/SuicideWatch, archived from the original on 3 November 2023:
      Public school was hell bc nb wanted to be my friend or associate with me due to me being trans.

Noun

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nb

  1. (cricket) Initialism of no ball.

Phrase

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nb

  1. Initialism of nota bene.

Adjective

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nb (not comparable)

  1. Alternative form of NB: initialism of non-binary.

Anagrams

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Demotic

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Etymology 1

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From Egyptian
nb
(nb, all, every).

Pronunciation

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Determiner

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  1. (definite) all, every
  2. (indefinite) any
Descendants
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  • Akhmimic Coptic: ⲛⲓⲙ (nim)
  • Bohairic Coptic: ⲛⲓⲃⲉⲛ (niben)
  • Fayyumic Coptic: ⲛⲓⲃⲓ (nibi)
  • Lycopolitan Coptic: ⲛⲓⲙ (nim)
  • Oxyrhynchite Coptic: ⲛⲓⲙ (nim)
  • Coptic Dialect P: ⲛⲓⲃ (nib)
  • Sahidic Coptic: ⲛⲓⲙ (nim)

Etymology 2

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From Egyptian
nbA1
(nb, lord).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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  m

  1. lord
Descendants
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Etymology 3

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From Egyptian
nb
t
(nbt, mistress, lady).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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  f

  1. mistress, lady (woman with authority over something)

References

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  • Erichsen, Wolja (1954) Demotisches Glossar, Copenhagen: Ejnar Munksgaard, pages 212–213
  • Johnson, Janet (2000) Thus Wrote ꜥOnchsheshonqy: An Introductory Grammar of Demotic[5], third edition, Chicago: The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, →ISBN, page 7

Egyptian

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Etymology 1

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Pronunciation

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Determiner

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nb
  1. all, every
  2. every other
  3. all sorts of, all kinds of
  4. (especially in negated clauses) any
Inflection
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In the Pyramid Texts of Unas, among certain other Old Egyptian texts, nb is usually not inflected by gender and number but invariably appears as nb. Even within these texts, however, inflected forms sporadically appear.[1]

In Late Egyptian, as all forms collapsed together with the masculine singular, the usual writing of the word came to follow the old feminine singular,

nb
t

(nbt).

Alternative forms
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Derived terms
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Descendants
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Etymology 2

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Ehret attempts to derive this term from a Proto-Afroasiatic *ruub- (to send).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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nb

 m

  1. lord, master, ruler (of a place or people)
    • 12th Dynasty, Stela of Nakhti, British Museum EA 143:
      Q1ir
      nb
      A40DdDdwO49
      t Z1
      nTraA
      wsjr nb-ḏdw nṯr-ꜥꜣ […]
      Osiris, Lord of Djedu, the elder god […]
    • c. 1550 BCE – 1295 BCE, Great Hymn to Osiris (Stela of Amenmose, Louvre C 286) line 23:
      E9wiit
      nDs
      O35
      nDs
      sy
      E9
      wr
      ww
      D54tA
      m
      Htp
      Z2
      Xr
      r
      nb
      Z1
      f
      jwyt zb(.w) sjw(w) rw.w tꜣ m ḥtpw ẖr nb.f
      Wrongdoing has gone, the Slanderer has departed, and the land is in peace under its lord.
  2. (without following genitive noun, often as a term of address) master, superior
  3. master (of a span of time)
  4. owner, possessor, bearer (of an object)
  5. possessor (of an abstract quality)
    • c. 1550 BCE – 1295 BCE, Great Hymn to Osiris (Stela of Amenmose, Louvre C 286) lines 23–24:
      smn
      n
      Y1
      mAatn
      nb
      z
      r
      a
      wAa18 Z1
      r
      isf
      t
      nDs
      smn mꜣꜥt n nb.s rdjw sꜣ r jsft
      Righteousness has been established for its possessor, and the back is turned on wrong.
  6. an epithet of the king
  7. an epithet of various gods, especially Osiris
Inflection
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Alternative forms
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By the Late Period, the usual writing of the word came to follow the old feminine equivalent nbt (lady, mistress), as the two words merged into one.

Derived terms
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Descendants
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Etymology 3

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From m- (noun-forming prefix) +‎ *bw(j) (abomination) with regular dissimilation of m- to n- before a labial; for the stem, compare bwt (abomination), bwj (to abominate).[3]

Pronunciation

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Noun

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nbwG37

 m

  1. (hapax) sin, damage, impurity [Greco-Roman Period]
Descendants
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Etymology 4

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Romanization

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nb

  1. Alternative transliteration of nbw (gold).

References

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  • nb (lemma ID 81660)”, in Thesaurus Linguae Aegyptiae[6], Corpus issue 17, Web app version 2.01 edition, Tonio Sebastian Richter & Daniel A. Werning by order of the Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften and Hans-Werner Fischer-Elfert & Peter Dils by order of the Sächsische Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Leipzig, 2004–15 December 2022
  • nb (lemma ID 81650)”, in Thesaurus Linguae Aegyptiae[7], Corpus issue 17, Web app version 2.01 edition, Tonio Sebastian Richter & Daniel A. Werning by order of the Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften and Hans-Werner Fischer-Elfert & Peter Dils by order of the Sächsische Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Leipzig, 2004–15 December 2022
  • nbw (lemma ID 82730)”, in Thesaurus Linguae Aegyptiae[8], Corpus issue 17, Web app version 2.01 edition, Tonio Sebastian Richter & Daniel A. Werning by order of the Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften and Hans-Werner Fischer-Elfert & Peter Dils by order of the Sächsische Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Leipzig, 2004–15 December 2022
  • Erman, Adolf, Grapow, Hermann (1928) Wörterbuch der ägyptischen Sprache[9], volume 2, Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, →ISBN, pages 227.5–230.14, 234.3–236.5
  • Faulkner, Raymond Oliver (1962) A Concise Dictionary of Middle Egyptian, Oxford: Griffith Institute, →ISBN, pages 128–129
  • Wilson, Penelope (1991) A Lexicographical Study of the Ptolemaic Texts in the Temple of Edfu, Liverpool: University of Liverpool, pages 896–897, 903
  • Černý, Jaroslav (1976) Coptic Etymological Dictionary, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 106
  • Hoch, James (1997) Middle Egyptian Grammar, Mississauga: Benben Publications, →ISBN, page 42
  1. ^ Allen, James P. (2017) A Grammar of the Ancient Egyptian Pyramid Texts, Volume 1: Unis, page 55
  2. ^ Loprieno, Antonio (1995) Ancient Egyptian: A Linguistic Introduction, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, pages 36, 55
  3. ^ Gundacker, Roman (2011) “On the Etymology of the Egyptian Crown Name mrsw.t*: An “Irregular” Subgroup of m-Prefix Formations” in Lingua Aegyptia, volume 19, page 44