Translingual edit

Prefix edit

n-

  1. (SI prefix) Abbreviation of nano-.

English edit

Etymology edit

Abbreviation of normal.

Pronunciation edit

Prefix edit

n-

  1. (organic chemistry) normal-form of a functional group (or molecule), being the long-chain form (unbranched chain)

Coordinate terms edit

  • s- (secondary form)
  • t- (tertiary form)

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

See also edit

Abenaki edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Related to nia (I, me).

Prefix edit

n-

  1. (prefixed to nouns, used before consonants) my
  2. (prefixed to verbs, used before consonants) I
  3. (prefixed to verbs, used before consonants) I (exclusive we)

Coordinate terms edit

  • nd- (used before vowels)

Albanian edit

Alternative forms edit

  • ën-Buzuku
  • m-before labials

Etymology edit

From Proto-Indo-European *h₁én (in).[1][2]

Prefix edit

n-

  1. intensive prefix. on, to, at

Derived terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Schumacher, Stefan; Matzinger, Joachim (2013) Die Verben des Altalbanischen: Belegwörterbuch, Vorgeschichte und Etymologie (Albanische Forschungen; 33) (in German), Wiesbaden: Otto Harrassowitz, →ISBN
  2. ^ Orel, Vladimir E. (2000) A concise historical grammar of the Albanian language: reconstruction of Proto-Albanian[1], Leiden, Boston, Köln: Brill, →ISBN, pages 168

Aromanian edit

Prefix edit

n-

  1. Alternative form of ãn-

Big Nambas edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Oceanic *na

Article edit

n-

  1. The noun article. Added to nouns and verb stems to affirm nominal use. Has an element of definiteness. Also used in derivation.

Usage notes edit

This form used before vowels. Before consonants, the form na- is used.

References edit

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Dutch ne, en, from Old Dutch ne, from Proto-Germanic *ne.

Prefix edit

n-

  1. Used to negate the pronoun or adverb which follows it, yielding the same part of speech

Derived terms edit

Egyptian edit

Prefix edit

n
  1. forms intransitive or reflexive verbs from existing verbs

Derived terms edit

Prefix edit

n
  1. Alternative form of m- (noun-forming prefix) before labial consonants

References edit

  • Satzinger, Helmut (2017) “A Lexicon of Egyptian Lexical Roots (Project)” in Quaderni di Vicino Oriente, volume 12, pages 213–223

Emilian edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

n- (adverbial)

  1. (before a vowel) Alternative form of in
    A-g n-ò dimándi.I have a lot (of them).

French edit

Etymology edit

Abbreviation of normale.

Pronunciation edit

Prefix edit

n-

  1. (organic chemistry) n-; (normal-form)

Derived terms edit

Kamba edit

Alternative forms edit

Prefix edit

n-

  1. I (used for conjugating verbs to the subjective or nominative case of the personal pronoun)

Maltese edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Arabicنَ(na, first-person plural imperfect prefix). The use also for the first-person singular is found in Maghrebi Arabic dialects.

Alternative forms edit

Prefix edit

n-

  1. First-person prefix in the imperfect conjugation
    n- + ‎kiteb (he wrote) → ‎nikteb (I write)

Etymology 2 edit

Article edit

n-

  1. Alternative form of il-
Usage notes edit
  • Used after a vowel and before the letter n. For details on usage, see the main lemma.

Neapolitan edit

Alternative forms edit

  • m-, l- (from assimilation to following consonants)

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin in-.

Prefix edit

n-

  1. in

Derived terms edit

Ojibwe edit

Prefix edit

n-

  1. Alternative form of ni-

Usage notes edit

n- appears before stems that begin with the vowels oo and ii.

See also edit

Old Irish edit

Prefix edit

n- (class A infixed pronoun)

  1. us

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Prefix edit

n- (class B & C infixed pronoun)

  1. Alternative form of d-

Swahili edit

Alternative forms edit

  • (before a vowel) ny-
  • (before labial consonants) m-

Etymology edit

From Proto-Bantu *n-.

Prefix edit

n- (plural n-)

  1. n class(IX/X) noun prefix and adjective agreement prefix, denoting animals and miscellaneous nouns as well as their plurals, and plurals of some u class(XI) nouns
    nguo nzuria nice piece of cloth/nice clothes
    ulimi (tongue) → ‎ndimi (tongues)

Usage notes edit

Foreign borrowings that cannot fit other classes morphologically usually behave as n class(IX), but do not take this prefix.

Except for nouns where the stem is of one syllable, n can only be followed by g, d, j, y, and z in Swahili. As a result of this, when the stem starts with a vowel, n- changes to ny-, when it starts with a b or v it changes to m-, and *nw-, *nl-, and *nr- becomes mb-, nd-, and nd- respectively. In front of any stems where these rules cannot be applied, it disappears.

See also edit

Tooro edit

Alternative forms edit

  • (before /β/, /m/, /h/ or /p/) m-
  • (before a vowel) ny-

Etymology edit

From Proto-Bantu *ǹ-.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /n̩-/, (after /ɡ/ or /k/) [ŋ̩-], (after a vowel) /n-/

Prefix edit

n-

  1. I, 1st person singular subject concord
    n- + ‎-kora (to do) → ‎nkora (I do)
  2. positive imperative form of -n- (me; 1st person singular object concord)
    n- + ‎-ha (to give) → ‎mpa (give me)

See also edit

References edit

  • Kaji, Shigeki (2007) A Rutooro Vocabulary[2] (in English), Tokyo: Research Institute for Languages and Cultures of Asia and Africa (ILCAA), →ISBN, page 413

Ye'kwana edit

Etymology 1 edit

Cognate to prefixes analyzed as object nominalizers, switching nominalized forms from nouns of action to nouns referring to the patient argument. The Caura River form has a rather different scope of use.

Pronunciation edit

Prefix edit

n-

  1. Marks that (person markers on) a derivation from a transitive verb refer to the agent argument of the verb rather than the patient argument; used with verbs adverbialized with -e or nominalized with -dü or -'jüdü.
Usage notes edit

This prefix comes between the person marker and the verb stem.

Etymology 2 edit

Alternative forms edit

  • ni- (allomorph before a consonant)

Pronunciation edit

Prefix edit

n-

  1. Marks a nonderived transitive verb as having a third-person agent/subject and patient/object.
  2. Marks a nonderived intransitive verb with agent-like or patient-like argument as having a third-person argument/subject.
Usage notes edit

The form n- is used with stems that start with a vowel; ni- is used with those that start with a consonant, in which case the initial consonant is also palatalized.

This person marker is used with all types of verbs when marked with originally nonderived tense/aspect/mood markers, excepting only the admonitive -'no and prohibitive -i negative command suffixes and the uncertain future marker -tai, which require the transcategorical third person marker y-, and the distant past markers, which require the distance-specific person morpheme kün-.

Though in all other circumstances Ye'kwana third-person prefixes also cover the first person dual exclusive, this prefix is not used when the patient of a transitive verb is first-person-dual-exclusive.

Inflection edit

References edit

  • Cáceres, Natalia (2011), “n-”, in Grammaire Fonctionnelle-Typologique du Ye’kwana, Lyon, page 152, 182–184, 190–191, 200, 202–203

Zulu edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Bantu *n-.

Prefix edit

n-

  1. Class 9 simple noun prefix.

Usage notes edit

The variant form m- is used before stems beginning with a labial consonant (b, f, m, p, v).