private

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Latin prīvātus (bereaved, deprived, set apart from), perfect passive participle of prīvō (I bereave, deprive), from prīvus (private, one's own, peculiar).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɹaɪvɪt/, /ˈpɹaɪvət/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: pri‧vate

AdjectiveEdit

private (comparative more private, superlative most private)

  1. Belonging to, concerning, or accessible only to an individual person or a specific group.
    • 2013 June 14, Jonathan Freedland, “Obama's once hip brand is now tainted”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 1, page 18:
      Now we are liberal with our innermost secrets, spraying them into the public ether with a generosity our forebears could not have imagined. Where we once sent love letters in a sealed envelope, or stuck photographs of our children in a family album, now such private material is despatched to servers and clouds operated by people we don't know and will never meet.
    Her address is private; you can't have it.
    private papers
  2. Not accessible by the public.
    private property
  3. Not in governmental office or employment.
    • 2013 July 19, Peter Wilby, “Finland spreads word on schools”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 30:
      Imagine a country where children do nothing but play until they start compulsory schooling at age seven. Then, without exception, they attend comprehensives until the age of 16. [] There are no inspectors, no exams until the age of 18, no school league tables, no private tuition industry, no school uniforms. […]
    He quit public life, living quietly as a private citizen.
  4. Not publicly known; not open; secret.
    The identity of the beneficiaries of the trust is private.
  5. Protected from view or disturbance by others; secluded.
    Can we go somewhere more private?
  6. Not traded by the public.
    • 2013 June 22, “Engineers of a different kind”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8841, page 70:
      Private-equity nabobs bristle at being dubbed mere financiers. Piling debt onto companies’ balance-sheets is only a small part of what leveraged buy-outs are about, they insist. Improving the workings of the businesses they take over is just as core to their calling, if not more so. Much of their pleading is public-relations bluster.
    private corporation
  7. Secretive; reserved.
    He is a very private person.
  8. (US, of a room in a medical facility) Not shared with another patient.
  9. (not comparable, object-oriented programming) Accessible only to the class itself or instances of it, and not to other classes or even subclasses.

SynonymsEdit

  • (done in the view of others): secluded
  • (intended only for one's own use): personal
  • (not accessible by the public):
  • (not publicly known): secret

HyponymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

private (plural privates)

  1. A soldier of the lowest rank in the army.
  2. A doctor working in privately rather than publicly funded health care.
    • 1973, Health/PAC Bulletin (issues 48-67, page 2)
      In the cities and towns of California, privates are pressuring county governments to close or reduce in size their hospitals and to pay private hospitals for the care of low-income patients. Thus everything is stacked against public hospitals.
    • 1993, United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on the Judiciary. Subcommittee on Immigration and Refugee Affairs, The implementation of employer sanctions: Hearings
      Because you are already moving people with the limitations of what we did in 1982 on the capping of Medicare, you are finding out that the privates are picking up that slack, []
  3. (euphemistic, in the plural) The genitals.
  4. (obsolete) A secret message; a personal unofficial communication.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  5. (obsolete) Personal interest; particular business.
  6. (obsolete) Privacy; retirement.
  7. (obsolete) One not invested with a public office.
  8. (usually in the plural) A private lesson.
    If you want to learn ballet, consider taking privates.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • private at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • private in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • "private" in Raymond Williams, Keywords (revised), 1983, Fontana Press, page 242.
  • private in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911.

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From privata (private) +‎ -e (adverbial ending).

AdverbEdit

private

  1. privately

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

private

  1. inflection of privat:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

private

  1. feminine plural of privato

VerbEdit

private

  1. feminine plural past participle of privare
  2. second-person plural indicative present of privare
  3. second-person plural imperative of privare

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

prīvāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of prīvō

Norwegian BokmålEdit

AdjectiveEdit

private

  1. definite singular of privat
  2. plural of privat

Norwegian NynorskEdit

AdjectiveEdit

private

  1. definite singular of privat
  2. plural of privat

SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

private

  1. absolute definite natural masculine form of privat.